See also: płot

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English plot, plotte, from Old English plot (a plot of ground), from Proto-Germanic *plataz, *platjaz (a patch), of uncertain origin. Cognate with Middle Low German plet (patch, strip of cloth, rags), German Bletz (rags, bits, strip of land), Gothic 𐍀𐌻𐌰𐍄𐍃 (plats, a patch, rags). See also plat. See also complot for an influence on or source of the "secret plan" sense.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plot (plural plots)

  1. (authorship) The course of a story, comprising a series of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means. [from 1640s]
    Synonym: storyline
    • c. 1725, Alexander Pope, View of the Epic Poem
      If the plot or intrigue must be natural, and such as springs from the subject, then the winding up of the plot must be a probable consequence of all that went before.
  2. An area or land used for building on or planting on. [from 1550s]
    Synonym: parcel
  3. A graph or diagram drawn by hand or produced by a mechanical or electronic device.
  4. A secret plan to achieve an end, the end or means usually being illegal or otherwise questionable. [from 1580s]
    Synonyms: conspiracy, scheme
    The plot would have enabled them to get a majority on the board.
    The assassination of Lincoln was part of a larger plot.
  5. Contrivance; deep reach thought; ability to plot or intrigue.
    • a. 1669, John Denham, On Mr Thomas Killigrew's Return from Venice, and Mr William Murrey's from Scotland
      a man of much plot
  6. Participation in any stratagem or conspiracy.
  7. A plan; a purpose.
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      no other plot in their religion but serve God and save their souls

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

plot (third-person singular simple present plots, present participle plotting, simple past and past participle plotted)

  1. (transitive) To conceive (a crime, etc).
    They had plotted a robbery.
  2. (transitive) To trace out (a graph or diagram).
    They plotted the number of edits per day.
  3. (transitive) To mark (a point on a graph, chart, etc).
    Every five minutes they plotted their position.
    • 1602, Richard Carew, Survey on Cornwall
      This treatise plotteth down Cornwall as it now standeth.
  4. (intransitive) To conceive a crime, misdeed, etc.
    They were plotting against the king.

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AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From plotë.

AdverbEdit

plot

  1. full, fully, full of

CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *plotъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plot m

  1. fence

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

plot

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of plotten
  2. imperative of plotten

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plot m (plural plots)

  1. traffic cone
  2. cone used in slalom

LuxembourgishEdit

VerbEdit

plot

  1. third-person singular present indicative of ploen
  2. second-person plural present indicative of ploen
  3. second-person plural imperative of ploen

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plot f

  1. genitive plural of plota

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *plotъ.

NounEdit

plȏt m (Cyrillic spelling пло̑т)

  1. fence

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

plot m (plural plots)

  1. (story-telling) plot