See also: Plot and płot

English edit

 
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Etymology edit

From Middle English plot, plotte, from Old English plot (a plot of ground), from Proto-Germanic *plataz, *platjaz (a patch), of uncertain origin. Cognate with Middle Low German plet (patch, strip of cloth, rags), German Bletz (rags, bits, strip of land), Gothic 𐍀𐌻𐌰𐍄𐍃 (plats, a patch, rags). See also plat. See also complot for an influence on or source of the "secret plan" sense.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

plot (plural plots)

  1. (narratology) The course of a story, comprising a series of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means. [from 1640s]
    Synonym: storyline
    • c. 1725, Alexander Pope, View of the Epic Poem:
      If the plot or intrigue must be natural, and such as springs from the subject, then the winding up of the plot must be a probable consequence of all that went before.
  2. An area or land used for building on or planting on. [from 1550s]
    Synonym: parcel
  3. A grave.
    He's buried in the family plot.
  4. A graph or diagram drawn by hand or produced by a mechanical or electronic device.
    • 2017, Mark Chambers, Tony Holmes, Nakajima B5N ‘Kate’ and B6N ‘Jill’ Units, page 32:
      I was told to fly out on a vector of 100 degrees to meet a strong plot of aircraft 30 miles from the coast.
  5. A secret plan to achieve an end, the end or means usually being illegal or otherwise questionable. [from 1580s]
    Synonyms: conspiracy, scheme
    The plot would have enabled them to get a majority on the board.
    The assassination of Lincoln was part of a larger plot.
  6. Contrivance; deep reach thought; ability to plot or intrigue.
    • a. 1669, John Denham, On Mr Thomas Killigrew's Return from Venice, and Mr William Murrey's from Scotland:
      a man of much plot
  7. Participation in any stratagem or conspiracy.
  8. A plan; a purpose.
    • 1651, Jer[emy] Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living. [], 2nd edition, London: [] Francis Ashe [], →OCLC:
      no other plot in their religion but serve God and save their souls
  9. (fandom slang, euphemistic) Attractive physical attributes of characters involved in a story (originating from ironic juxtaposition with the original meaning, "course of the story").
    I'm not sure what's happening in that show, I mainly watch it for the plot.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

plot (third-person singular simple present plots, present participle plotting, simple past and past participle plotted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To conceive (a crime, misdeed etc).
    They had plotted a robbery.
    They were plotting against the king.
  2. (transitive) To trace out (a graph or diagram).
    They plotted the number of edits per day.
  3. (transitive) To mark (a point on a graph, chart, etc).
    Every five minutes they plotted their position.
    • 1602, Richard Carew, Survey on Cornwall:
      This treatise plotteth down Cornwall as it now standeth.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

  1. En

Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₁tós (full),[1][2][3] from the root *pleh₁- (to fill). Compare Sanskrit प्रात (prātá), Latin com-plētus.

Adverb edit

plót

  1. fully, to full capacity, to the brim
    Synonym: mbushur
    Antonyms: bosh, zbrazët
    me gojën plotwith one's mouth full
    Dhoma ishte plot.The house was full.
  2. full, cramped (of people, things, etc.)
    Synonym: mbushur
    Kopshti ishte plot me lule.The garden was full of flowers.
  3. a lot, much
    Synonyms: shumë, mjaft
  4. with everything, lacking nothing. complete, full
  5. with a full, complete view
    Është hëna plot.It's a full moon.
  6. (colloquial) successfully
    Synonym: në shenjë
    Antonym: bosh
  7. full of. followed by an indefinite form
    Synonyms: tërë, gjithë
    plot gëzimfull of joy
  8. exactly, precisely
    Synonyms: pikërisht, tamam
    plot dy orëexactly two hours

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Meyer, G. (1891), “pľot”, in Etymologisches Wörterbuch der albanesischen Sprache [Etymological Dictionary of the Albanian Language] (in German), Strasbourg: Karl J. Trübner, →DOI, page 345
  2. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959), “pel-, pelə-, pēl-”, in Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume 3, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 799
  3. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998), “plotë”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden; Boston; Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 335

Further reading edit

  • “plot”, in FGJSSH: Fjalor i gjuhës së sotme shqipe [Dictionary of the modern Albanian language]‎[1] (in Albanian), 1980

Czech edit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Czech plot, from Proto-Slavic *plotъ.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

plot m inan

  1. fence
    dřevěný plotwooden fence

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • plot in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • plot in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • plot in Internetová jazyková příručka

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

plot

  1. inflection of plotten:
    1. first/second/third-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

plot m (plural plots)

  1. traffic cone
  2. cone used in slalom

Further reading edit

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology edit

From Dutch plot, from English plot, from Middle English plot, plotte, from Old English plot (a plot of ground), from Proto-Germanic *plataz, *platjaz (a patch), of uncertain origin.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

plot (first-person possessive plotku, second-person possessive plotmu, third-person possessive plotnya)

  1. (art, literature) plot, storyline: the course of a story, comprising a series of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means.
    Synonyms: alur, alur cerita, jalan cerita

Further reading edit

Luxembourgish edit

Verb edit

plot

  1. third-person singular present indicative of ploen
  2. second-person plural present indicative of ploen
  3. second-person plural imperative of ploen

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

plot f

  1. genitive plural of plota

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *plotъ.

Noun edit

plȏt m (Cyrillic spelling пло̑т)

  1. fence

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • plot” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • plot” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Spanish edit

Noun edit

plot m (plural plots)

  1. (story-telling) plot