See also: Yard

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

  • yaird (obsolete, Scotland)
  • yeard (archaic)
  • yerd (obsolete)
  • yod (pronunciation spelling)

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English yerd, yard, ȝerd, ȝeard, from Old English ġeard (yard, garden, fence, enclosure, enclosed place, court, residence, dwelling, home, region, land; hedge), from Proto-Germanic *gardaz (enclosure, yard) (compare Dutch gaard, obsolete German Gart, Swedish and Norwegian Bokmål gård, Norwegian Nynorsk gard), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰórdʰos, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰerdʰ- (to enclose) (Lithuanian gardas (pen, enclosure), Russian го́род (górod, town), Albanian gardh (fence), Romanian gard, Avestan 𐬔𐬆𐬭𐬆𐬛𐬵𐬀(gərədha, dev's cave), Sanskrit गृह (gṛha)), Medieval Latin gardinus, Medieval Latin jardinus. Doublet of garden.

NounEdit

yard (plural yards)

  1. A small, usually uncultivated area adjoining or (now especially) within the precincts of a house or other building.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      'Twas early June, the new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies in the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the sun was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with light green streaks where the shoal showed.
  2. (US, Canada, Australia) The property surrounding one's house, typically dominated by one's lawn.
    Synonym: (UK) garden
  3. An enclosed area designated for a specific purpose, e.g. on farms, railways etc.
    • 1931, Francis Beeding, “2/2”, in Death Walks in Eastrepps[1]:
      A little further on, to the right, was a large garage, where the charabancs stood, half in and half out of the yard.
  4. A place where moose or deer herd together in winter for pasture, protection, etc.
  5. (Jamaican, MLE) One’s house or home.
    • 2020 December 15, “We Paid (Remix)”, performed by #GS28 Goose, 0:15–0:21:
      Man’s devilish cunt, tell me nutting about friends, that’s dead
      Cuz I run up in yards,
      No vest, tryna ching man’s chest
      And leave him dead
Derived termsEdit

See also Yard

TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

yard (third-person singular simple present yards, present participle yarding, simple past and past participle yarded)

  1. (transitive) To confine to a yard.
    • 1893, Elijah Kellogg, Good old times, or, Grandfather's struggles for a homestead:
      As they reached the door, Bose, having yarded the cows, was stealing around the corner of the pig-sty, and making for the woods.
    • 1902, Barbara Baynton, Sally Krimmer; Alan Lawson, editors, Bush Studies (Portable Australian Authors: Barbara Baynton), St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, published 1980, page 14:
      The sheep were straggling in a manner that meant walking work to round them, and he supposed he would have to yard them tonight, if she didn't liven up.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English ȝerde, yerd, ȝerd, from Old English ġierd (branch; rod, staff; measuring stick; yardland), from Proto-West Germanic *gaʀd, from Proto-Germanic *gazdaz. Cognate with Dutch gard (twig), German Gerte and probably related to Latin hasta (spear).[1]

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

NounEdit

yard (plural yards)

  1. A unit of length equal to 3 feet in the US customary and British imperial systems of measurement, equal to precisely 0.9144 m since 1959 (US) or 1963 (UK).
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Thinks I to myself, “Sol, you're run off your course again. This is a rich man's summer ‘cottage’ [].” So I started to back away again into the bushes. But I hadn't backed more'n a couple of yards when I see something so amazing that I couldn't help scooching down behind the bayberries and looking at it.
  2. Units of similar composition or length in other systems.
  3. (nautical) Any spar carried aloft.
    1. (nautical) A long tapered timber hung on a mast to which is bent a sail, and may be further qualified as a square, lateen, or lug yard. The first is hung at right angles to the mast, the latter two hang obliquely.
  4. (obsolete) A branch, twig, or shoot.
  5. (obsolete) A staff, rod, or stick.
  6. (obsolete, medicine) A penis.
  7. (US, slang, uncommon) 100 dollars.
  8. (obsolete) The yardland, an obsolete English unit of land roughly understood as 30 acres.
    • a. 1634, W. Noye, The Complete Lawyer, 57:
      You must note, that two Fardells of Land make a Nooke of Land, and two Nookes make halfe a Yard of Land.
  9. (obsolete) The rod, a surveying unit of (once) 15 or (now) 16+12 feet.
  10. (obsolete) The rood, area bound by a square rod, 14 acre.
SynonymsEdit
  • (arm length): See ell
  • ($100): See hundred
  • (surveying measure): See rod
  • (large unit of area): See virgate
  • (small unit of area): See rood
HypernymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of milliard.

NounEdit

yard (plural yards)

  1. (finance) 109, A short scale billion; a long scale thousand millions or milliard.
    I need to hedge a yard of yen.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ed. "yard, n.2". Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1921.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

yard m

  1. yard (unit of length)

Further readingEdit

  • yard in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • yard in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English yard.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

yard m (plural yards)

  1. yard (unit of length)

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English yard.

NounEdit

yard f (plural yards)

  1. yard (unit of length)
    Synonym: iarda

Further readingEdit

  • yard in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Jamaican CreoleEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English yard.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /jɑːd/, /jɔːd/
  • Hyphenation: yard

NounEdit

yard

  1. home
    • 1999, Kamala Kempadoo, Sun, Sex, and Gold: Tourism and Sex Work in the Caribbean (in English), →ISBN, page 138:
      “You say use a condom and dem say, "Mi naah use condom, mi have mi wife a mi yard and mi wife clean and me clean."”
      You say use a condom and they say, "I'm not going to use a condom. My wife's at home and my wife and I are both clean."
    Unnu love people yard too much.
    Y'all love spending time in other people's homes too much.
    Nuh weh nuh nice like yard.
    There's no place like home.

NounEdit

yard (plural: yard dem, quantified: yard)

  1. yard

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

yard

  1. Alternative form of yerd