Last modified on 19 May 2015, at 01:58

beach

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

Stinson Beach, in California.

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bache, bæcche (bank, sandbank), from Old English bæċe, beċe (beck, brook, stream), from Proto-Germanic *bakiz (brook), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰog- (flowing water). Cognate with Dutch beek (brook, stream), German Bach (brook, stream), Swedish bäck (stream, brook, creek). More at batch, beck.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

beach (plural beaches)

  1. The shore of a body of water, especially when sandy or pebbly.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path […]. It twisted and turned, [] and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn. And, back of the lawn, was a big, old-fashioned house, with piazzas stretching in front of it, and all blazing with lights. 'Twas the house I'd seen the roof of from the beach.
  2. (Discuss(+) this sense) A horizontal strip of land, usually sandy, adjoining water.
    • 1988, Robert Ferro, Second Son:
      Up and down, the beach lay empty for miles.
  3. (UK dialectal, Sussex, Kentish) The loose pebbles of the seashore, especially worn by waves; shingle.

SynonymsEdit

  • (shore, especially when sandy):
  • (horizontal strip of land adjoining water): sand, strand, backshore

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

beach (third-person singular simple present beaches, present participle beaching, simple past and past participle beached)

  1. To run (something) aground on a beach.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English beach.

NounEdit

beach m (plural beachs)

  1. (Congo) port where goods and passengers embark and debark
    • 2006 March 14, Tshiala David, Baisse du trafic au beach Ngobila entre Kinshasa et Brazzaville, in Le Potentiel:
      C’est ainsi qu’elles ont décidé d’embarquer leurs marchandises dans des pirogues motorisés qui desservent les beachs privés entre les deux rives du fleuve Congo.
    • 2007, Jean-Alexis M'Foutou, La langue française au Congo-Brazzaville:
      Le Beach de Brazzaville hier réputé lieu de violence, de viols et de braquages, présent aujourd’hui des conditions de sécurité plutôt rassurantes.

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish bech, from Proto-Celtic *beko-, *bikos (compare Middle Welsh begegyr, bygegyr ‘drone’), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰik- ~ *bʰoik- (compare Czech včela, Latin fūcus), enlargement of *bʰī-, *bʰei- (compare Welsh bydaf ‘beehive’, English bee).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

beach f (genitive beiche, plural beacha)

  1. bee (insect)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
beach bheach mbeach
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish bech

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

beach m (genitive beacha, plural beachan)

Beach air flùr
Bee on flower
  1. bee
  2. beehive
  3. wasp

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit