Last modified on 25 May 2014, at 12:58

bua

CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Childish variant of buba (pimple), from Medieval Latin būbō (bubo), from Ancient Greek βουβών (boubṓn, groin, swelling).

NounEdit

bua f (plural bues)

  1. pimple
  2. (childish) badness
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alteration of gúa.

NounEdit

bua f (plural bues)

  1. (archaic, nautical, metrology) A unit of length used in measuring ships. Approximately the same as a yard, it was defined as 4 pams (spans).

See alsoEdit

  • cana (fathom)
  • pam (span)

GagauzEdit

NounEdit

bua (definite accusative [[{{{1}}}#Gagauz|{{{1}}}]], plural [[{{{2}}}#Gagauz|{{{2}}}]])

  1. ox

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier buadh, from Old Irish búaid; compare Scottish Gaelic buaidh, Breton buz, Welsh budd.

NounEdit

bua m (genitive bua, nominative plural buanna)

  1. (sports, competition) victory, win
  2. (ability) talent, gift, faculty, forte
  3. merit
  4. destiny

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

bua

  1. analytic subjunctive form of buaigh

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bua bhua mbua
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

"bua" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla (An Gúm, 1977), by Niall Ó Dónaill


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bua f (plural bue)

  1. (childish) pain, discomfort

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Onomatopoeia

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bua f (genitive buae); first declension

  1. The sound made by infants when asking for their drink; baba.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit