Last modified on 20 January 2015, at 16:58

conception

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English conceptioun, from Old French conception, from Latin conceptio (a comprehending, a collection, composition, an expression, also a becoming pregnant), from concipere, past participle conceptus (conceive); see conceive.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

conception (plural conceptions)

  1. The act of conceiving.
  2. The state of being conceived; the beginning.
  3. The fertilization of an ovum by a sperm to form a zygote.
  4. The start of pregnancy.
  5. The formation of a conceptus or an implanted embryo.
  6. The power or faculty of apprehending of forming an idea in the mind; the power of recalling a past sensation or perception; the ability to form mental abstractions.
  7. An image, idea, or notion formed in the mind; a concept, plan or design.

QuotationsEdit

  • 1611, Bible (Authorized, or King James, Version)[1], Genesis 3:16
    Unto the woman he said, I will greatly multiply thy sorrow and thy conception [transl. הרון]; in sorrow thou shalt bring forth children; and thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee.

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin conceptio (comprehension, understanding).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.kəp.sjɔ̃/

NounEdit

conception f (plural conceptions)

  1. conception (of a child)
  2. conception (beginning, start)
  3. ability to understand
  4. viewpoint; angle
  5. concept, idea

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Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

conception f (oblique plural conceptions, nominative singular conception, nominative plural conceptions)

  1. conception (of a child)