Last modified on 14 September 2014, at 17:23
See also: PLAN, Plan, and plán

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From French plan (a ground-plot of a building), from plan (flat), a later form of the vernacular plain, from Latin planus (flat, plane); see plain, plane.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plan (plural plans)

  1. A drawing showing technical details of a building, machine, etc., with unwanted details omitted, and often using symbols rather than detailed drawing to represent doors, valves, etc.
    The plans for many important buildings were once publicly available.
  2. A set of intended actions, usually mutually related, through which one expects to achieve a goal.
    He didn't really have a plan; he had a goal and a habit of control.
  3. A two-dimensional drawing of a building as seen from above with obscuring or irrelevant details such as roof removed, or of a floor of a building, revealing the internal layout; as distinct from the elevation.
    Seen in plan, the building had numerous passageways not apparent to visitors.
  4. A method; a way of procedure; a custom.
    • Wordsworth
      The simple plan, / That they should take who have the power, / And they should keep who can.

Usage notesEdit

  • A plan ("set of intended actions") can be developed, executed, implemented, ignored, abandoned, scrapped, changed, etc.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

  • (2-dimensional drawing of a building) blueprint

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

plan (third-person singular simple present plans, present participle planning, simple past and past participle planned)

  1. (transitive) To design (a building, machine, etc.).
    The architect planned the building for the client.
  2. (transitive) To create a plan for.
    They jointly planned the project in phases, with good detail for the first month.
  3. (intransitive) To intend.
    • 2013 August 10, “Can China clean up fast enough?”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8848: 
      It has jailed environmental activists and is planning to limit the power of judicial oversight by handing a state-approved body a monopoly over bringing environmental lawsuits.
    He planned to go, but work intervened.
  4. See plan on.
    I was planning on going, but something came up.
  5. (intransitive) To make a plan.
    They planned for the worst, bringing lots of emergency supplies.

Usage notesEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

StatisticsEdit

External linksEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plan n (plural plannen, diminutive plannetje n)

  1. A set of intended actions, through which one expects to achieve a goal.
  2. A technical drawing.
  3. A detailed map.

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

plan

  1. first-person singular present indicative of plannen
  2. imperative of plannen

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plan m (plural plans)

  1. plan
  2. map (schematic maps of streets, subways, etc.)

AdjectiveEdit

plan m (feminine plane, masculine plural plans, feminine plural planes)

  1. planar

External linksEdit


GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

plan (comparative planer, superlative am plansten)

  1. planar

DeclensionEdit

External linksEdit

  • plan in Duden online

Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From German, from Latin.

NounEdit

plan n (definite singular planet, indefinite plural plan, definite plural plana)

  1. plane
  2. level

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

plan m (definite singular planen, indefinite plural planar, definite plural planane)

  1. plan
    Kva er planen din?
    What's your plan?

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin.

AdjectiveEdit

plan (masculine and feminine plan, neuter plant, definite singular and plural plane, comparative planare, indefinite superlative planast, definite superlative planaste)

  1. plane, flat

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plan m

  1. plan
  2. set (scenery for a film or play)

DeclensionEdit

External linksEdit

  • plan” in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plȃn m (Cyrillic spelling пла̑н)

  1. plan

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin planus

NounEdit

plan m (plural planes)

  1. plan
  2. intention
  3. (colloquial) mood
    • Vamos en plan rómantico.
      • We’re going in a romantic mood.

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

plan (comparative planare, superlative planast)

  1. flat; horizontal (of a surface)

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

plan n

  1. (mathematics) a plane; flat surface.
  2. a plane; level of existence
    • astralplan
      • astral plane
  3. an aeroplane

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

plan c

  1. a drawing showing how to construct a building, machine, etc.
  2. a set of intended actions, through which one expects to achieve a goal.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


VolapükEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plan (plural plans)

  1. plant (botany)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit