dialogue

See also: dialogué

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dialoge (French dialogue), from Late Latin dialogus, from Ancient Greek διάλογος (dialogos, conversation, discourse), from διά (dia, through, inter) + λόγος (logos, speech, oration, discourse), from διαλέγομαι (dialegomai, to converse), from διά (dia) + λέγειν (legein, to speak).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dialogue (plural dialogues)

  1. A conversation or other form of discourse between two or more individuals.
    Bill and Melinda maintained a dialogue via email over the course of their long-distance relationship.
    • 2013, Paul Harris, Lance Armstrong faces multi-million dollar legal challenges after confession (in The Guardian, 19 January 2013)[1]
      The hours of dialogue with Winfrey, which culminated in a choked-up moment on Friday night as he discussed the impact of his cheating on his family, appear to have failed to give Armstrong the redemption that he craves.
  2. In a dramatic or literary presentation, the verbal parts of the script or text; the verbalizations of the actors or characters.
    The movie had great special effects, but the dialogue was lackluster.
  3. A literary form, where the presentation resembles a conversation.
    A literary historian, she specialized in the dialogues of ancient Greek philosophers.
  4. (computing) A dialogue box.
    Once the My Computer dialogue opens, select Local Disk (C:), then right click and scroll down.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dialogue (third-person singular simple present dialogues, present participle dialoguing, simple past and past participle dialogued)

  1. (informal, business) To discuss or negotiate so that all parties can reach an understanding.
    Pearson wanted to dialogue with his overseas counterparts about the new reporting requirements.
  2. (obsolete) To take part in a dialogue; to dialogize.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin dialogus, from Ancient Greek διάλογος (dialogos, conversation, discourse), from διά (dia, through, inter) + λόγος (logos, speech, oration, discourse), from διαλέγομαι (dialegomai, to converse), from διά (dia) + λέγειν (legein, to speak).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dialogue m (plural dialogues)

  1. dialogue

VerbEdit

dialogue

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dialoguer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of dialoguer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of dialoguer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of dialoguer
  5. second-person singular imperative of dialoguer

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

dialogue

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of dialogar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of dialogar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of dialogar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of dialogar.
Last modified on 8 April 2014, at 15:24