Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 03:48

elixir

See also: elixír and élixir

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin elixir, from Arabic الإكسير (al-’iksīr), from Ancient Greek ξήριον (ksḗrion, medicinal powder), from ξηρός (ksērós, dry).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

elixir (plural elixirs)

  1. (alchemy) A liquid which converts lead to gold.
    • 2002, Philip Ball, The Elements: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford 2004, p. 59:
      For Chinese alchemists, gold held the key to the Elixir, the Eastern equivalent of the Philosopher's Stone.
  2. A liquid which is believed to cure all ills and gives eternal life.
  3. (pharmacy) A sweet flavored liquid (usually containing a small amount of alcohol) used in compounding medicines to be taken by mouth in order to mask an unpleasant taste.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

elixir

  1. to choose
  2. to elect

SynonymsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

elixir m (plural elixires)

  1. (alchemy) elixir (liquid which was believed to turn non-precious metals to gold)
  2. (fiction) a magical potion