Last modified on 30 July 2014, at 18:59

factor

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French facteur, from Latin factor (a doer, maker, performer), from factus (done or made), perfect passive participle of faciō (do, make).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

factor (plural factors)

  1. (obsolete) A doer, maker; a person who does things for another person or organization.
    The factor of the trading post bought the furs.
  2. (now rare) An agent or representative.
    • Christopher Marlowe
      My factor sends me word, a merchant's fled / That owes me for a hundred tun of wine.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.21:
      And let such as will number the Kings of Castile and Portugall amongst the warlike and magnanimous conquerors, seeke for some other adherent then my selfe, forsomuch as twelve hundred leagues from their idle residence they have made themselves masters of both Indias, onely by the conduct and direction of their factors, of whom it would be knowne whether they durst but goe and enjoy them in person.
    • 1644, John Milton, Aeropagitica:
      What does he therefore, but resolvs to give over toyling, and to find himself out som factor, to whose care and credit he may commit the whole managing of his religious affairs; som Divine of note and estimation that must be.
  3. One of the elements, circumstances, or influences which contribute to produce a result.
    The greatest factor in the decision was the need for public transportation.
    The economy was a factor in this year's budget figures.
  4. (mathematics) Any of various objects multiplied together to form some whole.
    • 1956, Arthur C. Clarke, The City and the Stars, p.38:
      The first thousand primes [] marched in order before him [] the complete sequence of all those numbers that possessed no factors except themselves and unity.
    3 is a factor of 12, as are 2, 4 and 6.
    The factors of the Klein four-group are both cyclic of order 2.
  5. (root cause analysis) Influence; a phenomenon that affects the nature, the magnitude, and/or the timing of a consequence.
    • 2013 May-June, Charles T. Ambrose, “Alzheimer’s Disease”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 200: 
      Similar studies of rats have employed four different intracranial resorbable, slow sustained release systems— […]. Such a slow-release device containing angiogenic factors could be placed on the pia mater covering the cerebral cortex and tested in persons with senile dementia in long term studies.
    The launch temperature was a factor of the Challenger disaster.
  6. (economics) A resource used in the production of goods or services, a factor of production.
    • 2013 June 22, “T time”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 68: 
      The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them [] is often assumed to be the preserve of high-tech companies. [] current tax rules make it easy for all sorts of firms to generate [] “stateless income”: profit subject to tax in a jurisdiction that is neither the location of the factors of production that generate the income nor where the parent firm is domiciled.
  7. (Scotland) A steward or bailiff of an estate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

factor (third-person singular simple present factors, present participle factoring, simple past and past participle factored)

  1. (transitive) To find all the factors of (a number or other mathematical object) (the objects that divide it evenly).
  2. (of a number or other mathematical object, intransitive) To be a product of other objects.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin factor

NounEdit

factor m (plural factors)

  1. factor (integral part)

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French facteur, from Latin factor (a doer, maker, performer), from factus (done or made), perfect passive participle of faciō (do, make).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fac‧tor

NounEdit

factor m (plural factoren, diminutive factortje n)

  1. a factor, element
  2. (mathematics) factor

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From faciō (do, make).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

factor m (genitive factōris); third declension

  1. One who or which does or makes something; doer, maker, performer, perpetrator, agent, player.

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative factor factōrēs
genitive factōris factōrum
dative factōrī factōribus
accusative factōrem factōrēs
ablative factōre factōribus
vocative factor factōrēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • factor in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

factor m (plural factores)

  1. Alternative spelling of fator (superseded in Brazil by the 1943 spelling reform, and by the Orthographic Agreement of 1990 elsewhere. Still used in countries where the agreement hasn’t come into effect, and as an alternative spelling in Portugal, where the agreement came into effect in May 2009.)

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

factor m (plural factores)

  1. factor