horror

See also: Horror

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • horrour (UK, hypercorrect spelling or archaic)

EtymologyEdit

From Old French horror, from Latin horror (a bristling, a shaking, trembling as with cold or fear, terror), from horrere (to bristle, shake, be terrified).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

horror (plural horrors)

  1. An intense painful emotion of fear or repugnance.
  2. An intense dislike or aversion; an abhorrence.
  3. A literary genre, generally of a gothic character.
  4. (informal) An intense anxiety or a nervous depression; this sense can also be spoken or written as the horrors.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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External linksEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From horreo +‎ -or.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

horror m (genitive horrōris); third declension

  1. bristling (standing on end)
  2. shaking, shivering, chill
  3. dread, terror, horror

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative horror horrōrēs
genitive horrōris horrōrum
dative horrōrī horrōribus
accusative horrōrem horrōrēs
ablative horrōre horrōribus
vocative horror horrōrēs

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin horror, horroris.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

horror m (plural horrores)

  1. horror

SynonymsEdit

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SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin horror, horroris

NounEdit

horror m (plural horrores)

  1. horror

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 12:12