Last modified on 10 September 2014, at 19:26

magister

See also: Magister and magíster

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin magister (a master, chief, head, superior, director, teacher, etc.), from magis (more or great) + -ter.

NounEdit

magister (plural magisters)

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

  1. Master; sir: -- a title of the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority, or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts.
  2. The possessor of a master's degree.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From magis (more or great) + *-tero-. Compare minister.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

magister m (genitive magistrī); second declension

  1. teacher.
  2. master; a title of the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority, or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts.

DeclensionEdit

Second declension, nominative singular in -er.

Number Singular Plural
nominative magister magistrī
genitive magistrī magistrōrum
dative magistrō magistrīs
accusative magistrum magistrōs
ablative magistrō magistrīs
vocative magister
magistre
magistrī

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


NorwegianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin magister.

NounEdit

magister

  1. The possessor of the academic degree of magister, an historical equivalent of the doctorate (1479–1845 and 1921–2003)

RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin magister.

NounEdit

magister m (plural magisters)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) male teacher

SynonymsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) scolast
  • (Sutsilvan) surmester

Coordinate termsEdit