masquerade

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mascarade (Spanish mascarada), from Italian mascarata (mascherata). See “mask”.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

masquerade (plural masquerades)

  1. A party or assembly of people wearing masks, and amusing themselves with dancing, conversation, or other diversions.
    In courtly balls and midnight masquerades - Alexander Pope
  2. (obsolete) A dramatic performance by actors in masks; a mask. See “mask
  3. Acting or living under false pretenses; concealment of something by a false or unreal show; pretentious show; disguise.
    I was invited to the masquerade at their home.
    That masquerade of misrepresentation which invariably accompanied the political eloquence of Rome - Thomas de Quincey
  4. A Spanish diversion on horseback.

TranslationsEdit

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See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

masquerade (third-person singular simple present masquerades, present participle masquerading, simple past and past participle masqueraded)

  1. (intransitive) To assemble in masks; to take part in a masquerade.
    I'm going to masquerade as the wikipede. What are you going to dress up as?
  2. (intransitive) To frolic or disport in disguise; to make a pretentious show of being what one is not.
    He masqueraded as my friend until the truth finally came out.
    A freak took an ass in the head, and he goes into the woods, masquerading up and down in a lion's skin - Roger L'Estrange
  3. (transitive) To conceal with masks; to disguise.
    To masquerade vice - Killingbeck

TranslationsEdit

Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 07:07