Last modified on 8 July 2014, at 14:27

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *moriō < Latin morior. Compare Daco-Romanian muri, mor.

VerbEdit

mor (past participle muritã)

  1. I die.

Related termsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *mori (compare Welsh môr, Old Irish muir), from Proto-Indo-European *móri (compare Latin mare, English mere, German Meer, Dutch meer).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mor m

  1. sea

Derived termsEdit

  • Mor-Bihan (Department in Brittany, meaning "small sea")

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

mor

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of morir
  2. second-person singular imperative form of morir

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *mori (compare Welsh môr, Old Irish muir), from Proto-Indo-European *móri (compare Latin mare, English mere, German Meer, Dutch meer).

NounEdit

mor m (plural moryow)

  1. sea

Derived termsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *mer-.

NounEdit

mor m

  1. plague (specific disease)
  2. pestilence, plague (any highly contagious disease)

Derived termsEdit


DalmatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūrus.

NounEdit

mor m

  1. wall

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From moder, from Old Norse móðir, from Proto-Germanic *mōdēr, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂tēr.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mor c (singular definite moren, plural indefinite mødre)

  1. mother (woman who has, conceives, gives birth to, or raises a child)
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Probably a merging of two words

NounEdit

mor c (singular definite moren or morren, not used in plural form)

  1. (geology) raw humus

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin Maurus, from Ancient Greek μαυρός (maurós, dark).

NounEdit

mor c (singular definite moren, plural indefinite morer)

  1. (dated) Moor
SynonymsEdit
InflectionEdit

VerbEdit

mor

  1. Imperative of more.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mor

  1. first-person singular present indicative of morren
  2. imperative of morren

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

mor

  1. rafsi of morko.

NorwegianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From moder, from Old Norse móðir, from Proto-Germanic *mōdēr, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂tēr.

NounEdit

mor c (irregular, indefinite singular possessive mors, definite singular mora or moren, definite singular possessive moras or morens, indefinite plural mødre, indefinite plural possessive mødres, definite plural mødrene, definite plural possessive mødrenes)

  1. mother

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *mōraz. Cognate with Old Saxon mōr (Dutch moer), Middle Low German mōr (German Moor), Old High German muor, Old Norse mǫr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mōr m

  1. moor
  2. mountain

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mor

  1. first-person singular present tense form of muri.
  2. first-person singular subjunctive form of muri.
  3. third-person plural present tense form of muri.

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Short form of moder.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mor c

  1. mother

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


TurkishEdit

NounEdit

mor

  1. purple

AdjectiveEdit

mor

  1. purple

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

IPA: [mɔr]

AdverbEdit

mor

  1. how, so, as