Last modified on 4 December 2014, at 19:29

mor

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *moriō < Latin morior. Compare Daco-Romanian muri, mor.

VerbEdit

mor (past participle muritã)

  1. I die.

Related termsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *mori (compare Welsh môr, Old Irish muir), from Proto-Indo-European *móri (compare Latin mare, English mere, German Meer, Dutch meer).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mor m

  1. sea

Derived termsEdit

  • Mor-Bihan (Department in Brittany, meaning "small sea")

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

mor

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of morir
  2. second-person singular imperative form of morir

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *mori (compare Welsh môr, Old Irish muir), from Proto-Indo-European *móri (compare Latin mare, English mere, German Meer, Dutch meer).

NounEdit

mor m (plural moryow)

  1. sea

Derived termsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *mer-.

NounEdit

mor m

  1. plague (specific disease)
  2. pestilence, plague (any highly contagious disease)

Derived termsEdit


DalmatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūrus.

NounEdit

mor m

  1. wall

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From moder, from Old Norse móðir, from Proto-Germanic *mōdēr, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂tēr.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mor c (singular definite moren, plural indefinite mødre)

  1. mother (woman who has, conceives, gives birth to, or raises a child)
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Probably a merging of two words

NounEdit

mor c (singular definite moren or morren, not used in plural form)

  1. (geology) raw humus

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin Maurus, from Ancient Greek μαυρός (maurós, dark).

NounEdit

mor c (singular definite moren, plural indefinite morer)

  1. (dated) Moor
SynonymsEdit
InflectionEdit

VerbEdit

mor

  1. Imperative of more.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mor

  1. first-person singular present indicative of morren
  2. imperative of morren

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

mor

  1. rafsi of morko.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From moder, from Old Norse móðir, from Proto-Germanic *mōdēr, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂tēr.

NounEdit

mor m, f (definite singular mora or moren, indefinite plural mødre or mødrer, definite plural mødrene)

  1. a mother

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (archaic, formal or jokingly) moder

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse móðir.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mor f (definite singular mora; indefinite plural mødrer; definite plural mødrene)

  1. mother

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *mōraz. Cognate with Old Saxon mōr (Dutch moer), Middle Low German mōr (German Moor), Old High German muor, Old Norse mǫr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mōr m

  1. moor
  2. mountain

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mor

  1. first-person singular present tense form of muri.
  2. first-person singular subjunctive form of muri.
  3. third-person plural present tense form of muri.

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Short form of moder.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mor c

  1. mother

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


TurkishEdit

NounEdit

mor

  1. purple

AdjectiveEdit

mor

  1. purple

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

IPA: [mɔr]

AdverbEdit

mor

  1. how, so, as