For Wiktionary's links, see Wiktionary:Links
See also: Link

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English linke probably from Old Norse *hlenkr, from Proto-Germanic. Used in English since the 14th century.

NounEdit

link (plural links)

  1. A connection between places, people, events, things, or ideas.
    The mayor’s assistant serves as the link to the media.
    • Cowper
      The link of brotherhood, by which / One common Maker bound me to the kind.
    • Gascoigne
      And so by double links enchained themselves in lover's life.
  2. One element of a chain or other connected series.
    The third link of the silver chain needs to be resoldered.
    The weakest link.
  3. Abbreviation of hyperlink.
    The link on the page points to the sports scores.
  4. (computing) The connection between buses or systems.
    A by-N-link is composed of N lanes.
  5. (mathematics) A space comprising one or more disjoint knots.
  6. (Sussex) a thin wild bank of land splitting two cultivated patches and often linking two hills.
    • 2008, Richard John King, A Handbook for Travellers in Kent and Sussex
      They used formerly to live in caves or huts dug into the side of a bank or "link," and lined with heath or straw.
  7. (figuratively) an individual person or element in a system
    • 2010, James O. Young, My Sheep Know My Voice: anointed poetry, AuthorHouse, page 32:
      But know that God is the strongest link.
    • 2010, William Lidwell, Kritina Holden, Jill Butler, Universal Principles of Design, RockPort, page 262:
      The fuse is the weakest link in the system. As such, the fuse is also the most valuable link in the system.
    • 2010, Stephen Fairweather, The Missing Book of Genesis, AuthorHouse, page 219:
      [] . This is so that nobody can change the way every link must talk about the formula that I taught to make a real Chain of Universal Love and not a Chain of Love of a group or sect.
  8. Anything doubled and closed like a link of a chain.
    a link of horsehair
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mortimer to this entry?)
  9. (kinematics) Any one of the several elementary pieces of a mechanism, such as the fixed frame, or a rod, wheel, mass of confined liquid, etc., by which relative motion of other parts is produced and constrained.
  10. (engineering) Any intermediate rod or piece for transmitting force or motion, especially a short connecting rod with a bearing at each end; specifically (in steam engines) the slotted bar, or connecting piece, to the opposite ends of which the eccentric rods are jointed, and by means of which the movement of the valve is varied, in a link motion.
  11. (surveying) The length of one joint of Gunter's chain, being the hundredth part of it, or 7.92 inches, the chain being 66 feet in length.
  12. (chemistry) A bond of affinity, or a unit of valence between atoms; applied to a unit of chemical force or attraction.
HolonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

link (third-person singular simple present links, present participle linking, simple past and past participle linked)

  1. (transitive) To connect two or more things.
    • Eustace
      All the tribes and nations that composed it [the Roman Empire] were linked together, not only by the same laws and the same government, but by all the facilities of commodious intercourse, and of frequent communication.
  2. (intransitive, of a Web page) To contain a hyperlink to another page.
    My homepage links to my wife's.
  3. (transitive, Internet) To supply (somebody) with a hyperlink; to direct by means of a link.
    Haven't you seen his Web site? I'll link you to it.
  4. (transitive, Internet) To post a hyperlink to.
    Stop linking those unfunny comics all the time!
  5. (transitive) To demonstrate a correlation between two things.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Plausibly a modification of Medieval Latin linchinus (candle), an alteration of Latin lynchinus, itself from Ancient Greek λύχνος (lukhnos, lamp).

NounEdit

link (plural links)

  1. (obsolete) A torch, used to light dark streets.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      "Give me a loan of the link, Dick."
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Origin unknown.

VerbEdit

link (third-person singular simple present links, present participle linking, simple past and past participle linked)

  1. (Scotland) To skip or trip along smartly.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

EtymologyEdit

From English link (since 1995).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lenɡk/, [leŋɡ̊]

NounEdit

link n (singular definite linket, plural indefinite link or links)

  1. link (hyperlink)

SynonymsEdit

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

link (comparative linker, superlative linkst)

  1. dangerous
  2. (criminal slang) sly; cunning
  3. (slang) jolly, nice
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
  • linkerd

Etymology 2Edit

From English link, only since late 20th century.

NounEdit

link m (plural links, diminutive linkje n)

  1. physical connection, as in a hardware cable
  2. (figuratively) logical connection, as in reasoning about causality
  3. hyperlink
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German linc.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

link

  1. left
  2. sly; cunning.
  3. dangerous.

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English link. [1]

NounEdit

link (plural linkek)

  1. link, hyperlink
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Yiddish, German link. [1]

AdjectiveEdit

link (comparative linkebb, superlative leglinkebb)

  1. (colloquial) fishy, shifty (dishonest, criminal, unreliable)
    link alak - crook

ReferencesEdit


ItalianEdit

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From English link.

NounEdit

link m (invariable)

  1. (computing) link (hyperlink)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


LithuanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

lĩnk

  1. toward (used with genitive case)

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

link m

  1. link, hyperlink

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

  • hiperłącze
Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 04:14