Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 18:48

shackle

EnglishEdit

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A shackle—a U-shaped piece of metal.

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English schakkyl, schakle, from Old English sceacel, sceacul, scacul (shackle, bond, fetter), from Proto-Germanic *skakulaz (shackle), from Proto-Indo-European *skeg-, *skek- (to jump, move, shake, stir), equivalent to shake +‎ -le. Cognate with Dutch schakel (link, shackle, clasp), German Schäckel (shackle), Danish skagle (a carriage trace), Swedish skakel (the loose shaft of a carriage), Icelandic skökull (a carriage pole).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

shackle (plural shackles)

  1. A restraint fit over a human or animal appendage, such as a wrist, ankle or finger. Usually used in plural, to indicate a pair joined by a chain; a hobble.
  2. A U-shaped piece of metal secured with a pin or bolt across the opening, or a hinged metal loop secured with a quick-release locking pin mechanism.
  3. (figuratively, usually in plural) A restraint on one's action, activity, or progress.
    • South
      His very will seems to be in bonds and shackles.
  4. A fetter-like band worn as an ornament.
    • Dampier
      Most of the men and women [] had all earrings made of gold, and gold shackles about their legs and arms.
  5. A link for connecting railroad cars; a drawlink or draglink.
  6. stubble
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Pegge to this entry?)

HyponymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

shackle (third-person singular simple present shackles, present participle shackling, simple past and past participle shackled)

  1. To restrain using shackles; to place in shackles.
  2. By extension, to render immobile or incapable; to inhibit the progress or abilities of someone or something.
    This law would effectively shackle its opposition.
    • 2011 February 12, Phil McNulty, “Man Utd 2 - 1 Man City”, BBC:
      Rooney, superbly shackled by City defender Vincent Kompany for so long as Ferguson surprisingly left Dimitar Berbatov on the bench, had previously cut a forlorn and frustrated figure but his natural instincts continue to serve him and United so well.

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ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English sceacel, sceacul, scacul (shackle, bond, fetter), from Proto-Germanic *skakulaz (shackle), from Proto-Indo-European *skeg-, *skek- (to jump, move, shake, stir).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

shackle (plural shackles)

  1. shackle, fetter, manacle
  2. (anatomy) wrist

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

tae shackle (third-person singular simple present shackles, present participle shacklin, simple past shackelt, past participle shackelt)

  1. to shackle