Last modified on 22 November 2014, at 19:33

fetter

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

Fetters in use.

EtymologyEdit

Old English feter. Cognate with Dutch veter (lace).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fetter (plural fetters)

  1. A chain or similar object used to bind a person or animal – often by its legs (usually in plural).
  2. (figuratively) Anything that restricts or restrains.
    • 1675, John Dryden, Aureng-zebe[1], Prologue:
      Passion's too fierce to be in fetters bound.
    • 1818, Mary Shelley, chapter 6, Frankenstein[2]:
      He looks upon study as an odious fetter; his time is spent in the open air, climbing the hills or rowing on the lake.
    • 1910, Erwin Rosen, “Prolog”, in In the Foreign Legion[3], edition HTML, The Gutenberg Project, published 2012:
      That was the turning-point of my life. I broke my fetters, and I fought a hard fight for a new career …

SynonymsEdit

(chains on legs):

HyponymsEdit

(chain binding generally):

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

fetter (third-person singular simple present fetters, present participle fettering, simple past and past participle fettered)

  1. (transitive) To shackle or bind up with fetters
  2. (transitive) To restrain or impede; to hamper.

Derived termsEdit

HyponymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fetter

  1. strong masculine singular nominative form of fett.
  2. strong feminine singular genitive form of fett.
  3. strong feminine singular dative form of fett.
  4. strong plural genitive form of fett.
  5. mixed masculine singular nominative form of fett.
  6. predicative comparative form of fett.

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

fetter

  1. indefinite plural of fett

VilamovianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: fet‧ter

NounEdit

fetter m (plural fettyn)

  1. paternal uncle (brother of someone’s father)