slogan

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Scottish Gaelic sluagh-ghairm 'battle cry'

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slogan (plural slogans)

  1. (obsolete) A battle cry (original meaning).
  2. A distinctive phrase of a person or group of people.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter XVIII:
      [Bertie Wooster:] “Right-ho,” I said, not much liking the assignment, but liking less the idea of endeavouring to thwart this incandescent aunt in her current frame of mind. Safety first, is the Wooster slogan.
  3. (advertising) A phrase associated with a product, used in advertising.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

  • Slogan mark
  • political slogan

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

slogan m

  1. slogan (advertising)

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

slogan m (plural slogans)

  1. slogan
  2. motto

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

English

NounEdit

slogan m (invariable)

  1. slogan (distinctive phrase)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English slogan

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /slǒɡaːn/
  • Hyphenation: slo‧gan

NounEdit

slògān m (Cyrillic spelling сло̀га̄н)

  1. slogan (distinctive phrase of a person or group of people)
  2. slogan (advertising)

DeclensionEdit

Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 14:36