wagon

See also: Wagon

EnglishEdit

A horse-drawn, covered wagon.
A station wagon.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch wagen, waghen, from Proto-Germanic *wagnaz. Compare the inherited doublet wain.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wagon (plural wagons)

  1. A four-wheeled cart for hauling loads.
  2. A freight car on a railway.
  3. A child's riding toy, four-wheeled and pulled or steered by a long handle in the front.
  4. (US, Australia, slang) A station wagon (or SUV).
  5. (slang) A paddy wagon.
  6. A truck, or lorry.
  7. (Ireland, slang, dated, derogatory) A derogatory term for a woman; bitch; slapper; cow.
    • 1974, in Threshold, Issues 25–27,[1] Lyric Players Theatre, page 96:
      “I’m not like that; I know what you mean but I’m not like that. When you said a field I nearly laughed because I was in a field last week with Ursula Brogan behind the football pitch. We followed Cissy Caffery there and two boys from the secondary. She’s a wagon. She did it with them one after the other, and we watched.”
    • 1990, Roddy Doyle, The Snapper, Penguin Group (1992), ISBN 978-0-14-017167-9:
      pages 30–31: —Don’t know. ——She hates us. It’s prob’ly cos Daddy called her a wagon at tha’ meetin’. ¶ Sharon laughed. She got out of bed. ¶ —He didn’t really call Miss O’Keefe a wagon, she told Tracy. —He was only messin’ with yeh.
    • 1998, Neville Thompson, Two Birds/One Stoned,[2] Poolbeg:
      page 8: “Well fuck yeh, yeh stuck-up little wagon.”

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

wagon (third-person singular simple present wagons, present participle wagoning, simple past and past participle wagoned)

  1. (transitive) To transport by means of a wagon.
  2. (intransitive) To travel in a wagon.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

wagon

EtymologyEdit

From English waggon, from Dutch wagen. The pronunciation was likely influenced by French wagon, which was also borrowed from English.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wagon m (plural wagons, diminutive wagonnetje n)

  1. car (a railway carriage, a nonpowered unit in a railroad train)

FrenchEdit

wagon

EtymologyEdit

From English waggon, from Dutch wagen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wagon m (plural wagons)

  1. a railway carriage (note that the word voiture is preferred for passenger transport)

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *wagōną.

VerbEdit

wagon

  1. to sway

PolishEdit

wagon

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wagon m

  1. car (a railway carriage, a nonpowered unit in a railroad train)

DeclensionEdit

Last modified on 9 April 2014, at 21:03