Last modified on 25 June 2014, at 10:31

wicked

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

1225-75 Middle English wikked, wikke, an alteration of wicke, adjectival use of Old English wicca (wizard, sorcerer)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wicked (comparative wickeder or more wicked, superlative wickedest or most wicked)

  1. Evil or mischievous by nature.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 6, The China Governess[2]:
      ‘[…] I remember a lady coming to inspect St. Mary's Home where I was brought up and seeing us all in our lovely Elizabethan uniforms we were so proud of, and bursting into tears all over us because “it was wicked to dress us like charity children”. […]’.
  2. (slang)  Excellent; awesome; masterful; deeply satisfying.
    That was a wicked guitar solo, bro!
Usage notesEdit
  • Nouns to which "wicked" is often applied: witch, person, man, woman, angel, deed, act, pleasure, delight, game, way, night, word.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

wicked (not comparable)

  1. (slang, New England, UK) Very, extremely.
    The band we went to see the other night was wicked loud!
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

the wicked pl

  1. People who are wicked.[1].
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See wick

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

wicked

  1. simple past tense and past participle of wick

AdjectiveEdit

wicked (not comparable)

  1. Having a wick.
    a two-wicked lamp
  2. (UK, dialect, chiefly Yorkshire) Infested with maggots.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Oxford dictionary [1]