Open main menu

Contents

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French estoffer, from Old French estoffer, estofer (to provide what is needed, equip, decorate) (originally: "stuff, upholster"), from Old Frankish *stopfôn (to put, shove, push in), from Proto-Germanic *stuppōną (to stop, close, push, prick), from Proto-Indo-European *stHb-, *stHbʰ-, *stemb-, *stembʰ- (to stay, support, stamp, become angry, be amazed). Cognate with Old High German stopfôn (to put, shove, push in), Old English stoppian (to stop, close an aperture). More at stop.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

étoffer

  1. to stuff (a pillow, food)
    Synonyms: confectionner, farcir
  2. (furniture) to upholster
  3. (clothing) to fill out
  4. to pad out; to flesh out (give something more substance)
    Synonym: enrichir
  5. (reflexive, also figuratively) to fill out (to get plumper)
    Je grandis, je grossis, je m'étoffe.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    • 2009 February 4, Claire Gatinois, “Hans Beck, créateur des figurines en plastique Playmobil”, in Le monde[1], archived from the original on 2009-02-05:
      L'univers de Playmobil s'est étoffé : animaux de la ferme, camions de pompiers, bateaux pirates… Une "ville Playmobil" a même été créée, à 10 kilomètres de Nuremberg.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit