Open main menu

EnglishEdit

Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies

EtymologyEdit

stop +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stopper (plural stoppers)

  1. Agent noun of stop, someone or something that stops something.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter IX:
      “It just shows you what women are like. A frightful sex, Bertie. There ought to be a law. I hope to live to see the day when women are no longer allowed.” “That would rather put a stopper on keeping the human race going, wouldn't it?” “Well, who wants to keep the human race going?”
    • 2000, Carole B. Cox, Empowering Grandparents Raising Grandchildren (page 28)
      Often, in our conversations we encourage people to talk, or we manage to stop them. This can happen without our even thinking about it. Following is a list of conversation starters and stoppers.
  2. A type of knot at the end of a rope, to prevent it from unravelling.
    Put a stopper in the knot.
  3. A bung or cork.
    We need a stopper or the boat will sink.
  4. (slang, soccer) Goalkeeper.
    He's the number one stopper in the country.
    • 2011 January 15, Saj Chowdhury, “Man City 4 - 3 Wolves”, in BBC[1]:
      And just before the interval, Kolarov, who was having one of his better games in a City shirt, fizzed in a cracker from 30 yards which the Wolves stopper unconvincingly pushed behind for a corner.
  5. (finance, slang) In the commodity futures market, someone who is long (owns) a futures contract and is demanding delivery because they want to take possession of the deliverable commodity.
    Cattle futures: spillover momentum plus evidence of a strong stopper (i.e., 96 loads demanded) should kick the opening higher.
  6. (rail transport) A train that calls at all or almost all stations between its origin and destination, including very small ones.
    • 1996, Susan Sallis, Touched by Angels[2], Random House, page 300:
      The local train was empty at midday. She changed at Yatton and caught a stopper into Bristol. There was an express calling at Exeter which left Bristol at twelve-forty-five and she caught it by the skin of her teeth.
  7. (botany) Any of several trees of the genus Eugenia, found in Florida and the West Indies.
    • 1890, Charles Sprague Sargent, The Silva of North America: A Description of the Trees which Grow Naturally in North America Exclusive of Mexico
      Red Stopper. Leaves ovate-oblong, contracted at the apex into long points, coriaceous. Eugenia Garber
  8. (nautical) A short rope for making something fast.
  9. A playspot where water flows back on itself, creating a retentive feature.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

stopper (third-person singular simple present stoppers, present participle stoppering, simple past and past participle stoppered)

  1. To close a container by using a stopper.
    He tightly stoppered the decanter, thinking the expensive liqueur had been evaporating.
    The diaphragmatic spasm of his hiccup caused his epiglottis to painfully stopper his windpipe with a loud "hic".

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

VerbEdit

stopper

  1. present of stoppe

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stopper m (plural stoppers, diminutive stoppertje n)

  1. stop (device to block path)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

1792, from English stop.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

stopper

  1. (colloquial) to stop
    il faut stopper cette hostilité permanente
    This permanent hostility must be stopped.

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

stopper

  1. present of stoppe