See also: diego

English

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Etymology

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From Spanish Diego, from an Iberian Didacus, of uncertain origin.

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Diego (plural Diegos)

  1. A male given name from Spanish Diego.

Derived terms

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Translations

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Noun

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Diego (plural Diegos)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of diego (Spanish speaker)
    • 1936, John Samson, chapter X, in In the Dictator's Grip: A Story of Adventure:
      I suppose the grog they serve out so liberally to those "Diegos" to keep up their courage in a fight had something to do with it. By Jove! that was a narrow escape.
    • 2000, L. J. Martin, Condor Canyon, Pinnacle Books, →ISBN:
      "You tell the law what happened out there at Rancho Del Robles Viejo. Those Mexicans have been getting away with things too long around this country. Think they still own it. It's time those Diegos were taken down a notch."
    • 2006, Lila Guzmán, Rick Guzmán, Lorenzo and the Turncoat, Arte Publico Press, page 159:
      The savory aroma of ham and eggs in Jubilee's special sauce wafted toward him. His mouth watered. He reached for his knife and fork. Beyond the fort's walls, a cannon thundered. "Damn those Diegos!" Dickson muttered. "Impossible to eat a meal in peace."
    • 2010, Yxta Maya Murray, The Good Girl's Guide to Getting Kidnapped, Penguin, →ISBN:
      "[F]orget the confession; I heard about what you did to those Diegos. All I need to know is, can I trust you? Time was, I could with my life—" His eyes darkened.

References

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  • Diego”, in OneLook Dictionary Search.

Anagrams

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French

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Etymology

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From Spanish Diego.

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Diego m

  1. a male given name.

Galician

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Archbishop Diego Gelmirez of Santiago de Compostela (ca 1069 – ca 1140), Didaco in this Latin chartulary

Etymology

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From the local Early Medieval Latin Didacus, attested since the 8th century. While frequently used as an alternative form of James, so equating this name and Santiago or Iago, there is no etymological relation in between both names.[1]

Proper noun

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Diego m

  1. a male given name

Derived terms

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References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “Diego”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “Diego”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Diego” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  1. ^ Lidia Becker (2009) Hispano-romanisches Namenbuch[1], Walter de Gruyter, →ISBN, retrieved 31 July 2018, pages 385-392

Italian

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Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology

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Borrowed from Spanish Diego, from the local Medieval Latin Didacus, attested since the 8th century.

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Diego m

  1. a male given name

References

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  1. ^ Diego in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Anagrams

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Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /d͡ʒiˈɛ.ɡu/ [d͡ʒɪˈɛ.ɡu], (faster pronunciation) /ˈd͡ʒjɛ.ɡu/
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /d͡ʒiˈɛ.ɡo/ [d͡ʒɪˈɛ.ɡo], (faster pronunciation) /ˈd͡ʒjɛ.ɡo/

Proper noun

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Diego m

  1. a male given name from Spanish

Spanish

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Etymology

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From an Iberian name, Latin Didacus, recorded from the 8th century, of unknown origin. Various suggestions include Greek, Basque and Celtiberian derivation, without wide acceptance of any proposal. The name Didacus is recorded in the vernacular as Diaco, Diago by the 10th century. The earliest record of the form Diego is of the late 11th century. Diego is the standard form in Spanish by the 14th century.

There has been a widespread folk etymology, current from at least the early 19th century, to the effect that the name is a reanalysis of Latin Sanctus Iacobus (Saint James), i.e. Sant-Yago read as San-Tiago, whence Diego. It has been common practice in Spanish to equate Jacob, Iacobus with Diego throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, e.g. the Enciclopedia Espasa-Calpe (1920) lists a number of Italian and German saints named Jacobo, Jakob under Diego. This derivation has been recognized as folk etymological since at least the 1970s.

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈdjeɡo/ [ˈd̪je.ɣ̞o]
  • Rhymes: -eɡo
  • Syllabification: Die‧go

Proper noun

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Diego m

  1. a male given name

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • English: Diego
  • Italian: Diego
  • Chinese: 迭戈 (Diégē) (transliteration)

References

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  • Lidia Becker, Hispano-romanisches Namenbuch: Untersuchung der Personennamen vorrömischer, griechischer und lateinisch-romanischer Etymologie auf der Iberischen Halbinsel im Mittelalter (6.-12. Jahrhundert), Walter de Gruyter (2009), 385–389.