See also: diego

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Diego (plural Diegos)

  1. A male given name from Spanish Diego.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

Diego (plural Diegos)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of diego (Spanish speaker)
    • 1936, John Samson, In the Dictator's Grip: A Story of Adventure, chapter X:
      I suppose the grog they serve out so liberally to those "Diegos" to keep up their courage in a fight had something to do with it. By Jove! that was a narrow escape.
    • 2000, L. J. Martin, Condor Canyon, Pinnacle Books (→ISBN):
      "You tell the law what happened out there at Rancho Del Robles Viejo. Those Mexicans have been getting away with things too long around this country. Think they still own it. It's time those Diegos were taken down a notch."
    • 2006, Lila Guzmán, Rick Guzmán, Lorenzo and the Turncoat, Arte Publico Press, page 159:
      The savory aroma of ham and eggs in Jubilee's special sauce wafted toward him. His mouth watered. He reached for his knife and fork. Beyond the fort's walls, a cannon thundered. "Damn those Diegos!" Dickson muttered. "Impossible to eat a meal in peace."
    • 2010, Yxta Maya Murray, The Good Girl's Guide to Getting Kidnapped, Penguin (→ISBN):
      "[F]orget the confession; I heard about what you did to those Diegos. All I need to know is, can I trust you? Time was, I could with my life—" His eyes darkened.

ReferencesEdit

  • Diego at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

 
Archbishop Diego Gelmirez of Santiago de Compostela (ca 1069 – ca 1140), Didaco in this Latin chartulary

EtymologyEdit

From the local Medieval Latin Didacus, attested since the 8th century. While frequently used as an alternative form of James, so equating this name and Santiago or Iago, there is no etymological relation in between both names.[1]

Proper nounEdit

Diego m

  1. A male given name

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Diego” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • Diego” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • Diego” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  1. ^ Lidia Becker (2009) Hispano-romanisches Namenbuch[1], Walter de Gruyter, →ISBN, pages 385-392

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish Diego, abbreviation of Santiago, from Latin Sanctus Iacobus (Saint James).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdjɛɡo/
  • Hyphenation: Die‧go

Proper nounEdit

Diego m

  1. A male given name

PortugueseEdit

Proper nounEdit

Diego m

  1. A male given name

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Santiago, from Latin Sanctus Iacobus (Saint James), the latter word deriving from Ancient Greek Ἰάκωβος (Iákōbos), from Hebrew יַעֲקֹב(ya‘ăqṓḇ, Jacob, literally heel-grabber), from עָקֵב(‘āqḗḇ, heel of the foot).

The name Diego is sometimes alternatively (erroneously) thought to derive from the Latin name Didacus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdjeɡo/, [ˈd̪jeɣo]

Proper nounEdit

Diego m

  1. A male given name, thought to be a diminutive of Santiago or, most likely, a contraction of the preposition "de" (of) + "Iago" (Galician for Jacob, which is pronounced "d'Iago").

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: Diego
  • Italian: Diego