See also: jerry

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Proper noun

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Jerry

  1. A diminutive of the male given names Jeremiah, Jeremy, Jerome, Jared, Jermaine, Jerrold, Gerald, Gerard, or similar male given names.
    • 1970, Santha Rama Rau, The Adventuress, page 157:
      ..."I, incidentally, am Jeremy Wilson, and anyone who abbreviates that to 'Jerry' does so at unspeakable peril."
      "Oh really?" Kay asked. "Why?"
      "Well, just a wartime hangover. We used to call the Germans 'Jerries'."
      "I don't know much about the German war."
  2. A diminutive of the female given names Geraldine or Jerilyn.
  3. An unincorporated community in Asotin County, Washington, United States; named for early rancher Jerry McGuire.
Alternative forms
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Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Noun

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Jerry (plural Jerries)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of jerry: a chamber pot

Etymology 3

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A clipped form of German popularized during the First World War.

Alternative forms

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Proper noun

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Jerry

  1. (UK, US, ethnic slur, dated) A personification of the German people.
    • 2012, Bill Leckie, Penthouse and Pavement:
      [] chucking your towel on the sunbed and making sure Jerry doesn't get there first.

Noun

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Jerry (plural Jerries)

  1. (British, US, ethnic slur, dated) A German, particularly a male German.
    Synonyms: Boche, Fritz, Kraut
    • 2012, Margaret James, The Penny Bangle, Harpenden: Choc Lit, →ISBN, page 43:
      But Robert had been cheeriness itself, had told them to buck up and think of England, reminding them that moaning wasn’t going to beat the Jerries.
Usage notes
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  • Reused during World War II and used since that war to connote lingering animosity or enmity towards Germans or Germany.
Derived terms
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Translations
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Swedish

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Etymology

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From English Jerry. First recorded as a Swedish given name in 1906.

Proper noun

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Jerry c (genitive Jerrys)

  1. a male given name