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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Kraut (cabbage), alluding to the use of cabbage as ingredient in German cuisine. From 19th c. but popularized during WWI/II.[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɹaʊt/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /kɹʌʊt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

NounEdit

Kraut (plural Krauts)

  1. (ethnic slur, offensive, slang) A German. [from 1841]
    Synonyms: Boche, Fritz, jerry, Hun, sauerkraut
    Coordinate terms: frog, rosbif

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ kraut” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.
  2. ^ Kraut” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press.

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German krūt, from Old High German krūt, chrūt, from Proto-Germanic *krūdą (plant, vegetable, herb). Cognate with Old Saxon krūd (whence Low German Kruut), Old Frisian krūd (whence Saterland Frisian Kruud), Old Dutch krūt (whence Dutch kruid), Yiddish קרויט(kroyt).

NounEdit

Kraut n (genitive Krauts or Krautes, plural Kräuter, diminutive Kräutchen n or Kräutlein n)

  1. (countable) herb; useful plant (plant used to flavour food, or for medicinal effect)
  2. (countable, botany) plant whose above-ground portions are not woody
  3. (uncountable, regional, southern Germany, Austria) cabbage (vegetable)
  4. (uncountable, regional, western Germany) a thick syrup made from sugar beets or, less often, fruit
Usage notesEdit
  • (cabbage): This sense has become common in northern and central Germany in the words Krautsalat and Sauerkraut, but not otherwise.
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From English Kraut (German), mostly via American films and books about World Wars I and II. The English term is from sauerkraut, due to the British and American perception of sauerkraut as a stereotypically German dish.

NounEdit

Kraut m (genitive Krauts, plural Krauts)

  1. (slang, derogatory, offensive) a German (from an Anglo-Saxon perspective)
SynonymsEdit
  • (a German, from an Anglo-Saxon perspective): Fritz

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German krūt, from Proto-Germanic *krūdą. Cognate with German Kraut, Dutch kruid, kruit, Icelandic krydd.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Kraut n (plural Kraider)

  1. herb, plant