See also: trauer

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German trūre (mourning), from Old High German trūrēn (to mourn), from Proto-Germanic *dreusaną (to fall) or *dreuzagaz (sad), both from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrews- (to break apart).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʁaʊ̯ɐ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ̯ɐ
  • (file)

NounEdit

Trauer f (genitive Trauer, no plural)

  1. grief, sorrow
    Antonyms: Begeisterung, Euphorie, Freude, Fröhlichkeit, Frohsinn, Glück, Seligkeit, Triumph, Wohlgemut, Wohlgefallen, Zufriedenheit
  2. mourning
    Synonym: Trauerzeit

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Proper nounEdit

Trauer m or f (proper noun, surname, masculine genitive Trauers or (with an article) Trauer, feminine genitive Trauer, plural Trauers or Trauer)

  1. a surname.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge (1883), “Trauer”, in John Francis Davis, transl., Etymological Dictionary of the German Language, published 1891

Further readingEdit


HunsrikEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German trūre (mourning), from Old High German trūrēn (to mourn), from Proto-Germanic *dreusaną (to fall) or *dreuzagaz (sad), both from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrews- (to break apart).

NounEdit

Trauer f

  1. mourning
    Eere Trauer dud meer Leed.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Further readingEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German trūre (mourning), from Old High German trūrēn (to mourn), from Proto-Germanic *dreusaną (to fall) or *dreuzagaz (sad), both from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrews- (to break apart).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Trauer f (uncountable)

  1. mourning, grief

Related termsEdit