EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English greef, gref, from Old French grief (grave, heavy, grievous, sad), from Latin gravis (heavy, grievous, sad). Doublet of grave.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹiːf/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːf

NounEdit

grief (countable and uncountable, plural griefs or grieves)

  1. Suffering, hardship. [from early 13th c.]
    The neighbour's teenage give me grief every time they see me.
  2. Emotional pain, generally arising from misfortune, significant personal loss, bereavement, misconduct of oneself or others, etc.; sorrow; sadness. [from early 14th c.]
    She was worn out from so much grief.
    The betrayal caused Jeff grief.
    • 1576, George Whetstone, “The Ortchard of Repentance: []”, in The Rocke of Regard, [], London: [] [H. Middleton] for Robert Waley, OCLC 837515946; republished in J[ohn] P[ayne] Collier, editor, The Rocke of Regard, [] (Illustrations of Early English Poetry; vol. 2, no. 2), London: Privately printed, [1867?], OCLC 706027473, page 291:
      And ſure, although it was invented to eaſe his mynde of griefe, there be a number of caveats therein to forewarne other young gentlemen to foreſtand with good government their folowing yl fortunes; []
  3. (countable) Cause or instance of sorrow or pain; that which afflicts or distresses; trial.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

grief (third-person singular simple present griefs, present participle griefing, simple past and past participle griefed)

  1. (online gaming) To deliberately harass and annoy or cause grief to other players of a game in order to interfere with their enjoyment of it; especially, to do this as one’s primary activity in the game. [from late 1990s]
    • 2008 January 18, Julian Dibbell, “Mutilated Furries, Flying Phalluses: Put the Blame on Griefers, the Sociopaths of the Virtual World”, in Wired[1]:
      While ban and his pals stand squarely in this tradition, they also stand for something new: the rise of organized griefing, grounded in online message-board communities and thick with in-jokes, code words, taboos, and an increasingly articulate sense of purpose. No longer just an isolated pathology, griefing has developed a full-fledged culture.

Usage notesEdit

  • This verb is most commonly found in the gerund-participle griefing and the derived noun griefer.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch grief, from Old French grief, from Vulgar Latin *grevis, from Latin gravis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

grief f (plural grieven, diminutive griefje n)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) grievance, complaint, bone to pick, issue

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French grief, from Vulgar Latin *grevis, from Latin gravis (later influenced by its antonym levis), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʷréh₂us. Doublet of grave.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

grief (feminine griève, masculine plural griefs, feminine plural grièves)

  1. (archaic, literary) grievous

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

grief m (plural griefs)

  1. complaint
  2. grief
  3. grievance (formal complaint filed with an authority)

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *grevis, from Latin gravis.

AdjectiveEdit

grief m (feminine singular grieva, masculine plural griefs, feminine plural grieves)

  1. arduous
  2. difficult
  3. steep

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • gref (typically Anglo-Norman)

EtymologyEdit

Probably from the verb grever, or from Vulgar Latin grevis (influenced by its antonym, levis), from Latin gravis.

NounEdit

grief m (oblique plural griés, nominative singular griés, nominative plural grief)

  1. pain; anguish; suffering

DescendantsEdit

  • French: grief
  • Middle Dutch: grief
  • Middle English: greef, gref

AdjectiveEdit

grief m (oblique and nominative feminine singular grieve)

  1. sad
    • late 12th century, anonymous, La Folie de Tristan d'Oxford, page 386 (of the Champion Classiques edition of Le Roman de Tristan, →ISBN, line 552:
      Mult ai le quer gref e marri.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

DescendantsEdit

  • French: grief (archaic, literary)