See also: wand

Contents

Central FranconianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • Wank (Ripuarian; now chiefly western dialects)

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German (*)wand, northern variant of want. For the phonetic development compare Hand.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Wand f (plural Wänn or Wäng, diminutive Wändche)

  1. (many dialects) wall

Usage notesEdit

  • The plural Wänn is used in Moselle Franconian and some southern dialects of Ripuarian. The form Wäng is used in many Ripuarian dialects, including Kölsch.

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German want, from Old High German want, from Proto-Germanic *wandiz (weave; wickerwork; plait; wall), from Proto-Indo-European *wendʰ- (to turn; bend; wind; twist; braid; weave).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Wand f (genitive Wand, plural Wände)

  1. wall, partition
  2. precipice

Usage notesEdit

  • The words Wand and Mauer were distinguished in the following manner:

Wand is the general term and Mauer the specific one for mineralic (stone, concrete) walls (e.g. not for a wall built from wood). Therefore most freestanding walls are a Mauer because of the necessary static needs but not all (e.g. a freestanding wall made of wood is no Mauer but a Wand). The term Mauer also is used for mineralic walls caused by natural forces like the charateristic leveés or embankments of a Hangmure fallen down from the slopes of a mountain ("mu(u)r" being the spelling of High German Mauer in Middle High German and even today of German dialects in Switzerland).

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit

  • Wand in Duden online

LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old High German wint, from Proto-Germanic *windaz.

NounEdit

Wand m (plural Wënn)

  1. wind
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old High German want.

NounEdit

Wand f (plural Wänn)

  1. (interior) wall
Derived termsEdit