See also: wand

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Various origins:

Proper nounEdit

Wand (plural Wands)

  1. A surname.

StatisticsEdit

  • According to the 2010 United States Census, Wand is the 28049th most common surname in the United States, belonging to 854 individuals. Wand is most common among White (84.19%) individuals.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Central FranconianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German *wand, northern variant of want. For the phonetic development compare Hand.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Wand f (plural Wänn or Wäng, diminutive Wändche)

  1. (many dialects) wall

Usage notesEdit

  • The plural Wänn is used in Moselle Franconian and some southern dialects of Ripuarian. The form Wäng is used in many Ripuarian dialects, including Kölsch.

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German want, from Old High German want, from Proto-Germanic *wanduz (weave; wickerwork; plait; fence, wall), from Proto-Indo-European *wendʰ- (to turn; bend; wind; twist; braid; weave). Cognate with English wand although developing a completely distinct meaning.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vant/, [vant], [ʋant]
  • Rhymes: -ant
  • (file)
  • (file)

NounEdit

Wand f (genitive Wand, plural Wände)

  1. wall, partition
  2. vertical face of a precipice, any large vertical surface

Usage notesEdit

  • The words Wand and Mauer are often but not always interchangeable. Even when they are synonymous, there is sometimes a preference for one of them:
  • Wand is predominant for walls that are not made of stone, concrete, or the like. Mauer usually implies masonry.
  • With stone walls, only Mauer is commonly used for freestanding ones.
  • Both words are used for the walls of buildings. Wand is the normal choice, however, when one refers to them as seen from the inside (for example, a painting is typically said to hang an der Wand, "on the wall", rather than an der Mauer).

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Wand” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Wand” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon
  • Wand” in Duden online
  •   Wand on the German Wikipedia.Wikipedia de

HunsrikEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Wand f (plural Wend)

  1. wall

Further readingEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German and Old High German wint.

NounEdit

Wand m (plural Wënn or Wanden)

  1. wind
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old High German want.

NounEdit

Wand f (plural Wänn)

  1. (interior) wall
Derived termsEdit

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German and Old High German want. Compare German Wand, Dutch wand, English wand.

NounEdit

Wand f (plural Wend)

  1. interior wall