EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

a- (in the direction of) +‎ beam (keel)

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

abeam (comparative more abeam, superlative most abeam)

  1. (nautical, aircraft) On the beam; at a right angle to the centerline or keel of a vessel [1] or aircraft; being at a bearing approximately 090 Degrees or 270 Degrees relative[2]. [Mid 19th century.][3]
  2. (nautical, aircraft) Alongside or abreast; opposite the center of the side of the ship or aircraft. [Mid 19th century.][3]

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

abeam (comparative more abeam, superlative most abeam)

  1. (nautical, aircraft) Alongside or abreast; opposite the center of the side of the ship or aircraft. [Mid 19th century.][3]
    • 2005, William Thomas Generous, Sweet Pea at War: A History of USS Portland[1], →ISBN, page 178:
      The attack on the abeam ship, Louisville, killed Commander Cruiser Division Four []
    The island was directly abeam of us.

PrepositionEdit

abeam

  1. (nautical) Alongside. [Mid 19th century.][3]
    She came abeam the crippled ship.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ FM 55-501 Marine Crewman’s Handbook
  2. ^ JP 1-02 Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 “abeam” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, →ISBN, page 3.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

abeam

  1. first-person singular present active subjunctive of abeō