See also: Keel

EnglishEdit

 
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1. Keel (light peach) 2. Skeg (dark purple) 3. Deadwood (olive drab) 4. Stern post (forest green) 5. Filling chock (bright yellow) 6. Filling transoms (pale yellow-green) 7. Wing transom (turquoise) 8. Helm port (orange) 9. Counter timbers (pale violet) 10. Margin (indigo) 11. Horn timber (green) 12. Stern timbers (apricot) 13. Side-counter timbers (pale yellow) 14. Quarter-timbers (red) 15. Fashion timber (fuchsia) 16. Cant frames (blue) 17. Square body frames (uncolored)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English kele, from Old Norse kjǫlr, itself from Proto-Germanic *keluz, perhaps ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gewlos. Distantly related to kile.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kiːl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːl

NounEdit

keel (plural keels)

  1. (nautical) A large beam along the underside of a ship’s hull from bow to stern.
  2. (nautical) A rigid, flat piece of material anchored to the lowest part of the hull of a ship to give it greater control and stability.
  3. (aeronautics) In a dirigible, a construction similar in form and use to a ship's keel; in an aeroplane, a fin or fixed surface employed to increase stability and to hold the machine to its course.
  4. (nautical) A type of flat-bottomed boat.
  5. (zoology) The periphery of a whorl extended to form a more or less flattened plate; a prominent spiral ridge.
  6. (botany) The two lowest petals of the corolla of a papilionaceous flower, united and enclosing the stamens and pistil; a carina.
    • 1985, Charles L. Scott, The Genus Haworthia (Liliaceae): A Taxonomic Revision (page 80)
      Vegetatively it is the nearest to H. translucens with its oblong-lanceolate leaves, with the margins and keel beset with pellucid teeth, but it differs and is characterised by the greyish-black quadrantly positioned globose flowers; []
  7. A brewer's cooling vat.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

keel (third-person singular simple present keels, present participle keeling, simple past and past participle keeled)

  1. (intransitive, followed by "over") to collapse, to fall
    He keeled over after having a stroke.
  2. To traverse with a keel; to navigate.
  3. To turn up the keel; to show the bottom.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English kelen, from Old English cēlan (to cool, to make or become cool), from Proto-West Germanic *kōlijan, from Proto-Germanic *kōlijaną (to cool). Cognate with Saterland Frisian käile, köile (to cool), Dutch koelen (to cool), German Low German köhlen (to cool), German kühlen (to cool), Danish køle (to cool), Icelandic kæla (to cool).

VerbEdit

keel (third-person singular simple present keels, present participle keeling, simple past and past participle keeled)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) to cool; make cool; to cool by stirring or skimming in order to keep from boiling over
    while greasy Joan doth keel the pot (Shakespeare)
  2. (transitive, obsolete) to moderate the ardour or intensity of; assuage; to appease, pacify, or lessen
  3. (intransitive, obsolete) to become cool; cool down
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

keel (plural keels)

  1. (brewing) A broad, flat vessel used for cooling liquids; a keelfat.

Etymology 3Edit

Probably from Scottish Gaelic cìl (ruddle).

NounEdit

keel

  1. (Scotland) Red chalk; ruddle.

VerbEdit

keel (third-person singular simple present keels, present participle keeling, simple past and past participle keeled)

  1. (Scotland, transitive) To mark with ruddle.

Etymology 4Edit

Compare Scots kele, keil, keill (to put to death, kill).

VerbEdit

keel (third-person singular simple present keels, present participle keeling, simple past and past participle keeled)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of kill.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch keel, from Middle Dutch kēle, from Old Dutch kela, from Proto-Germanic *kelǭ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

keel (plural kele)

  1. throat

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch kēle, from Old Dutch kela, from Proto-West Germanic *kelā, from Proto-Germanic *kelǭ.

NounEdit

keel f (plural kelen, diminutive keeltje n)

  1. throat
    Synonym: hals
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: keel
  • Negerhollands: keel

Etymology 2Edit

From French gueule (red throat of wild animals), from Old French goles, plural of gole (throat), from Latin gula. Distantly related to Etymology 1 above.

NounEdit

keel n (uncountable)

  1. (heraldry) gules, the blazoning term for the color red

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Finnic *keeli, from Proto-Uralic *käle. Cognate with Finnish kieli.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

keel (genitive keele, partitive keelt)

  1. language
  2. tongue
  3. string of musical instrument
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • keel in Eesti keele seletav sõnaraamat
  • keel in Eesti keele põhisõnavara sõnastik

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

keel

  1. adessive singular of kee

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

keel

  1. adessive singular of kesi

IngrianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

keel

  1. Alternative form of keeli

DeclensionEdit

Declension of keel (type 5/keeli, no gradation)
singular plural
nominative keel keelet
genitive keelen keeliin
partitive keeltä, keelt keeliä
illative keelee keelii
inessive keelees keeliis
elative keelest keelist
allative keelelle keelille
adessive keeleel keeliil
ablative keelelt keelilt
translative keeleks keeliks
essive keelennä, keeleen keelinnä, keeliin
exessive1) keelent keelint
1) obsolete
*) the accusative corresponds with either the genitive (sg) or nominative (pl)
**) the comitative is formed by adding the suffix -ka? or -kä? to the genitive.

ReferencesEdit

  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 162
  • Olga I. Konkova; Nikita A. Dyachkov (2014) Inkeroin Keel: Пособие по Ижорскому Языку[1], →ISBN, page 33

Tedim ChinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *keel, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *keel.

NounEdit

keel

  1. goat

ReferencesEdit

  • Zomi Ordbog based on the work of D.L. Haokip