amputate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin amputō (prune, cut away). The original sense of pruning (a tree, etc.) became obsolete. The OED[1] considers uses related to anything other than an animal limb to be figurative uses of the modern sense.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈæmpjʊteɪt/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

amputate (third-person singular simple present amputates, present participle amputating, simple past and past participle amputated)

  1. (obsolete) To cut off, to prune. [17th–18th c.]
  2. To surgically remove a part of the body, especially a limb. [from 17th c.]

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ James A. H. Murray [et al.], editor (1884–1928) , “Amputate”, in A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (Oxford English Dictionary), volume I (A–B), London: Clarendon Press, OCLC 15566697, page 295, column 2.

EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

amputate

  1. present adverbial passive participle of amputi

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

amputate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of amputare
  2. second-person plural imperative of amputare
  3. feminine plural of amputato

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

amputāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of amputō