anemone

See also: Anemone, anémone, and anêmone

EnglishEdit

 
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Anemone hortensis

EtymologyEdit

From Latin anemōnē, from Ancient Greek ἀνεμώνη (anemṓnē), from ἄνεμος (ánemos, wind) + matronymic suffix -ώνη (-ṓnē, daughter of the wind).[1]

Or from Phoenician *𐤍𐤏𐤌𐤍(*nʿmn), akin to Arabic شَقَائِق اَلنُّعْمَان(šaqāʾiq an-nuʿmān, anemones) and Hebrew (Isaiah Scroll) נִטְעֵי נַעֲמָנִים(nit'ei na'amanim, plants of pleasantness).[2][3][4]

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /əˈnɛm.ə.ni/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛməni

Often metathesized as IPA(key): /əˈnɛn.ə.mi/

NounEdit

anemone (plural anemones)

  1. Any plant of the genus Anemone, of the Ranunculaceae (or buttercup) family, such as the windflower.
    • 1922 , James Joyce, Ulysses, chapter V:[1]
      Then walking slowly forward he read the letter again, murmuring here and there a word. Angry tulips with you darling manflower punish your cactus if you don’t please poor forgetmenot how I long violets to dear roses when we soon anemone meet all naughty nightstalk wife Martha’s perfume. Having read it all (...)
  2. A sea anemone.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "anemone". Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford University Press. 2nd ed. 1989.
  2. ^ Edward Yechezkel Kutscher, The Language and Linguistic Background of the Isiah Scroll (Leiden, Netherlands: Brill, 1974), 380; first published in Hebrew, in Jerusalem, 1959.
  3. ^ Babcock, Philip, ed., Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged, s.v. "anemone" (Springfield, Mass.: Merriam-Webser, 1993).
  4. ^ C.T. Onions, The Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology, s.v. "anemone" (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1967).

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin anemōnē, from Ancient Greek ἀνεμώνη (anemṓnē).

NounEdit

anemone f (plural anemones)

  1. (botany) anemone
  2. (zoology) sea anemone
    Synonym: anemone de mar

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin anemōnē.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

anemone m (plural anemoni)

  1. anemone

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • anemone in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

LatinEdit

 
anemōnae (windflowers)

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἀνεμώνη (anemṓnē). Pliny says it was so called because the flowers opened only when the wind blew.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

anemōnē f (genitive anemōnēs); first declension

  1. windflower, anemone

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun (Greek-type).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative anemōnē anemōnae
Genitive anemōnēs anemōnārum
Dative anemōnae anemōnīs
Accusative anemōnēn anemōnās
Ablative anemōnē anemōnīs
Vocative anemōnē anemōnae

DescendantsEdit

  • English: anemone
  • French: anémone

ReferencesEdit

  • anemone in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • anemone in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • anemone in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aneˈmone/, [a.neˈmo.ne]

NounEdit

anemone f (plural anemones)

  1. Alternative form of anémona

Further readingEdit