See also: areté, aretê, and arête

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek ἀρετή (aretḗ).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arete (uncountable)

  1. (Classical philosophy) Virtue, excellence.
    • 1962, Lionel Ignacius Cusack Pearson, Popular Ethics in Ancient Greece, page 78 (translating a line from an old text):
      All arete is included in justice, Cyrnus.
  2. (Classical philosophy) The proper state or condition for a human.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

arete (plural aretes)

  1. Alternative spelling of arête

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

ārēte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of āreō

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aries, arietem, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁r-i-(e)t- (certain domestic animal).

NounEdit

arete m (plural areți)

  1. ram (male sheep)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From aro +‎ -ete.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aˈɾete/, [a.ˈɾe.t̪e]

NounEdit

arete m (plural aretes)

  1. (Latin America, Philippines) earring
    Synonym: pendiente

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit