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See also: armée and Armee

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EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

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Ultimately from Old French armee.

NounEdit

armee (genitive armee, partitive armee)

  1. army

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman, Old French armee, from Medieval Latin armata.

NounEdit

armee (plural armees)

  1. army

DescendantsEdit

  • English: army (borrowed)

Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • armée (16th and 17th centuries)

EtymologyEdit

First attested in France (as opposed to in Anglo-Norman) circa 1370[1]. Borrowed from Medieval Latin armata (perhaps via Anglo-Norman).

NounEdit

armee f (plural armees)

  1. army

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ armée” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).
  • armee on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330-1500) (in French)

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the feminine past participle of armer, corresponding to Medieval Latin armāta (armed force), nominalized feminine form of Latin armātus (armed), past participle of armō, armāre (arm).

NounEdit

armee f (oblique plural armees, nominative singular armee, nominative plural armees)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) army
    • 1847, M. Champollion-Figeac, Lettres de rois, reines et autres personnages des cours de France et d'Angleterre depuis Louis VII jusqu'à Henri IV, tirées des archives de Londres, Paris (date of cited texts 1301-1515)
      une autre tres puissante, grande et notable armee
      another very powerful, big and notable army

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

armee

  1. feminine singular of the past participle of armer