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See also: léger

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French léger, from (assumed) Latin leviarius, from levis (light in weight). See levity.

AdjectiveEdit

leger (comparative more leger, superlative most leger)

  1. (obsolete) light; slender; slim; trivial
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  2. lying or remaining in a place; hence, resident
    leger ambassador

NounEdit

leger (plural legers)

  1. (obsolete) anything that lies in a place; that which, or one who, remains in a place
  2. a minister or ambassador resident at a court or seat of government; also lieger, leiger
    • Fuller
      Sir Edward Carne, the queen's leger at Rome
  3. (obsolete) a ledger

VerbEdit

leger (third-person singular simple present legers, present participle legering, simple past and past participle legered)

  1. (Britain, fishing) to engage in bottom fishing

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for leger in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈleː.ɣər/
  • Hyphenation: le‧ger
  • Rhymes: -eːɣər
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch leger, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *legrą.

NounEdit

leger n (plural legers, diminutive legertje n)

  1. army, armed forces
    Het leger moet leger!The army must become emptier!
  2. form (habitation of a hare)
  3. (archaic) bed, crib
  4. (figuratively) mass, multitude
  5. Short for dijkleger.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

AdjectiveEdit

leger

  1. Comparative form of leeg

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

leger

  1. first-person singular present indicative of legeren
  2. imperative of legeren

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French léger.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

leger (comparative legerer, superlative am legersten)

  1. casual, informal
  2. (of clothing) dressed down

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

leger

  1. to read

ConjugationEdit


LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

leger

  1. Alternative form of lygger

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

leger m

  1. indefinite plural of lege

VerbEdit

leger

  1. present tense of lege

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

leger f

  1. indefinite plural of lege

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *legrą, from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ-. Cognate with Old Frisian leger, Old Saxon legar, Dutch leger (bed, camp, army), Old High German legar (German Lager (camp)), Old Norse legr (Danish lejr, Swedish läger (bed)), Gothic 𐌻𐌹𐌲𐍂𐍃 (ligrs). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek λέχος (lékhos), Latin lectus (bed), Proto-Celtic *leg- (Old Irish lige, Irish luighe), Proto-Slavic *ležati (Russian лежать (ležatʹ)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leġer n

  1. the state or action of lying, lying down, or lying ill
    on ðam sixtan dæge his legereson the sixth day of his illness
  2. resting-place; couch, bed
  3. death-bed, grave
    on gehalgodan legere licganto be buried in a consecrated grave

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


RomanschEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin legō, legere.

VerbEdit

leger

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Vallader) to read
ConjugationEdit
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

AdjectiveEdit

leger m (feminine singular legra, masculine plural legers, feminine plural legras)

  1. (Sursilvan) merry, happy
    Synonym: allegher
Alternative formsEdit
  • legher (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran)

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

leger (comparative legerare, superlative legerast)

  1. Alternative form of legär

InflectionEdit

Inflection of leger
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular leger legerare legerast
Neuter singular legert legerare legerast
Plural legera legerare legerast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 legere legerare legeraste
All legera legerare legeraste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.