See also: armá, armà, armâ, armã, and armă

AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon

ReferencesEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms).

NounEdit

arma f (plural armes)

  1. weapon

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


BasqueEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Spanish arma.

NounEdit

arma inan

  1. weapon

DeclensionEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan arma, from Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join).

NounEdit

arma f (plural armes)

  1. weapon
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

arma

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of armar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of armar

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

arma

  1. third-person singular past historic of armer

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese arma, from Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms).

NounEdit

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

arma

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐍂𐌼𐌰

IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

arma

  1. indefinite accusative plural of armur
  2. indefinite genitive plural of armur

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

arma (plural armas)

  1. weapon, arm

Related termsEdit


IrishEdit

NounEdit

arma

  1. inflection of arm:
    1. vocative plural
    2. (archaic) nominative plural

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
arma n-arma harma not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈar.ma/
  • Rhymes: -arma
  • Hyphenation: àr‧ma

Etymology 1Edit

From Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms, weapons of war, war, defense, tools), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join).

NounEdit

arma f (plural armi) (archaic plural arme)

  1. weapon, arms
  2. (military) arm, force
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

arma

  1. inflection of armare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join). armentum is an independent derivation from the same root, as if from Proto-Indo-European *h₂er-mn̥-tom. Cognates include Sanskrit ऋत (ṛtá, order; right; agreement etc.) and अरम् (áram, fitting), Ancient Greek ἀραρίσκω (ararískō, to fit together) and Old Armenian արարի (arari, I made).

Semantic development was "that what is fitted together" → "tools" → "weapons". Also related to ars, artus, rītus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arma n pl (genitive armōrum); second declension

(plural only)

  1. arms, weapons of war, weaponry (implements of warfare)
    Hypernym: tēla (offensive weapons)
    • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 29.4.2.3:
      mūnīre urbem, frūmentum convehere, tēla arma parāre
      to strengthen the defences of the city, to accumulate stores of corn, to prepare a supply of missiles and arms
    • 8th C. C.E., Paulus Diaconus (author), Karl Otfried Müller (editor), Excerpta ex libris Pompeii Festi De significatione verborum (1839), page 2, line 13:
      Arma propriē dīcuntur ab armīs, id est humerīs, dēpendentia, ut scūtum, gladius, pūgiō, sīca; ut ea, quibus procul proeliāmur, tēla.
      'Arma' 'weapons' are, properly speaking, that thich hangs from the 'armi', that is 'shoulders,' such as the shield, sword, dirk, dagger; and such as that using which we fight at a distance, missiles.
    1. defensive arms: armour, shields (etc.)
    2. close-quarter weapons (offensive or defensive)
      Antonym: tēla (missiles)
    3. (poetic) missile weapons
      Synonym: tēla
  2. (metonymically) military action, war (arms as instruments of policy)
  3. (abstract or concrete) warfare, battle (military exploits)
  4. (metonymically) troops, military forces, the army
  5. weapons as means of defence
  6. (by extension) tools, equipment
    Synonym: armāmenta
DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter), plural only.

Case Plural
Nominative arma
Genitive armōrum
armum
Dative armīs
Accusative arma
Ablative armīs
Vocative arma
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Nominative plural → feminine singular transfer common during the period.

NounEdit

arma f (genitive armae); first declension

  1. (Late Latin) a piece of weaponry
DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative arma armae
Genitive armae armārum
Dative armae armīs
Accusative armam armās
Ablative armā armīs
Vocative arma armae

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

  • arma in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • arma in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan arma, from Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon

Related termsEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From armr.

NounEdit

arma f (genitive ǫrmu, plural ǫrmur)

  1. pity

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • arma in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms).

AdjectiveEdit

arma f (oblique plural armas, nominative singular arma, nominative plural armas)

  1. weapon

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon; arm

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese arma, from Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join).

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon
    Synonym: armamento

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

arma

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of armar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of armar

QuechuaEdit

NounEdit

arma

  1. basin, sink, bathtub
  2. the Big Dipper

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin armāre, present active infinitive of armō.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

a arma (third-person singular present armează, past participle armat1st conj.

  1. to prepare a weapon for firing
  2. to arm, equip
  3. (figuratively) to strengthen by adding reinforcement (e.g. armor, a mineshaft, etc.)
ConjugationEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French armer.

VerbEdit

a arma (third-person singular present armează, past participle armat1st conj.

  1. to launch a ship in service with all necessary equipment

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

arma f

  1. definite nominative/accusative singular of armă

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɾma/, [ˈaɾ.ma]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Spanish arma, from Late Latin arma (weapon), from Latin arma (defensive arms), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join).

NounEdit

arma f (plural armas)

  1. weapon, arm
    El arma secretathe secret weapon
    Las armas secretasthe secret weapons
Usage notesEdit
  • The feminine noun arma is like other feminine nouns starting with a stressed a sound in that it takes the definite article el (normally reserved for masculine nouns) in the singular when there is no intervening adjective:
el arma
  • However, if an adjective, even one that begins with a stressed a sound such as alta or ancha, intervenes between the article and the noun, the article reverts to la.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

arma

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of armar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of armar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of armar.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

arma

  1. absolute singular definite and plural form of arm.

AnagramsEdit