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See also: àvid

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French avide, from Latin avidus (eager, desirous; greedy), from aveō (wish, desire, long for, crave).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

avid (comparative more avid, superlative most avid)

  1. enthusiastic; keen; eager; showing great interest in something or desire to do something
    I'm an avid reader.
    • 1999, Larry Zuckerman, The Potato: How the Humble Spud Rescued the Western World
      A blanket disdain for indigenous foods doesn't explain the delay, because Spain was avid to adopt a different New World root.
    • 1996, Janette Turner Hospital, Oyster, Virago Press, paperback edition, page 3
      We waited for something to happen, for anything to happen, we were avid for some event to unfold itself out of the burning nothing to save us.

Usage notesEdit

Usually followed by the preposition "to" then a verb e.g. avid to learn; or the preposition "for" then a noun e.g. avid for success (wanting success); also with the preposition "about" e.g. "He's avid about mechanics" (he's very interested in mechanics)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French avide, Latin avidus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

avid m or n (feminine singular avidă, masculine plural avizi, feminine and neuter plural avide)

  1. avid, eager, desirous
  2. greedy, grasping

DeclensionEdit