See also: Axel

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Diagram showing the performance of an axel (skating manouevre)
 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

axel ‎(plural axels)

  1. Misspelling of axle.
    • 1755, "A Country Gentleman", A New System of Agriculture; Or, A Plain, Easy, and Demonſtrative Method of ſpeedily growing Rich, page 177,
      This end of the Axel is to be faſten'd into a Wheel, exactly like thoſe, which are us'd in many Places, for the roaſting Meat.
    • 1900, Municipal Reports of the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan, page 85,
      Ten 4-wheel hose wagons, three with ballbearing axels and one with roller-bearing axels, all manufactured in the city.
    • 1944, Private and Local Acts Passed by the Legislature of Wisconsin, Publisher not identified, page 627,
      The gross weight on any 2 or more axels shall not exceed 26,000 pounds plus 1,000 pounds for each foot of distance measured longitudinally to the nearest foot between the foremost and rearmost of the axels under consideration.

Etymology 2Edit

From Axel(a given name), after Norwegian skater Axel Rudolf Paulsen (1855-1938), who in 1882 became the first to perform the jump.

NounEdit

axel ‎(plural axels)

  1. (figure skating) A jump that includes one (or more than one) complete turn and a half turn while in the air.
    • 1991, Harvard Magazine, Volume 94, page 44,
      Wylie, however, landed his Olympic axels beautifully and electrified the crowd as he capped a skating career that began at age three in Aspen, Colorado, when he followed two older sisters onto the ice.
    • 1997, Beverley Smith, A Year in Figure Skating, page 115,
      Men had to do triple Axels or at least attempt them with tenacity.
    • 2005, Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology, Volume 30, page 746,
      [] King et al. (1994) and King (1997) compared single, double, and triple axels of junior and senior level skaters; Albert and Miller (1996) compared single and double axels of “good” figure skaters; [] .
SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Swedish axl, from Old Norse ǫxl, from Proto-Germanic *ahslō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱs-.

NounEdit

axel c

  1. (anatomy) a shoulder; a body part
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Swedish axul, from Old Norse ǫxull. Related to Latin axis.

NounEdit

axel c

  1. an axis; an imagined line about which something rotates
  2. an axle; a rod around which a wheel turns
  3. a driveshaft; a rotating rod which transfers torque from a motor to a place where it can be applied
  4. (mathematics) an axis; as in coordinate axis
    Den reella axeln
    The real axis
  5. a jump in figure skating with one (or more) and a half turns in the air.
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit