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See also: bâiller

Contents

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French bailler, from Old French bailler, baillier, from Latin bajulāre, baiulāre, present active infinitive of baiulō.

VerbEdit

bailler

  1. (obsolete) to give
  2. To lend
  3. To rent, lease

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French baillier.

VerbEdit

bailler

  1. to bail (someone into someone else's custody)
  2. (by extension) to entrust (something to someone)
    • 1488, Jean Dupré, Lancelot du Lac:
      quant il les eut faictes si les scella & les bailla a la damoiselle pour porter l'andemain a court
      when he had written them [the letters] he then sealed them and entrusted them to the lady to take them tomorrow to the court

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

see baailler.

VerbEdit

bailler

  1. Alternative form of baailler (to yawn)

ConjugationEdit

  • Same conjugation for both etymologies.
  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

ReferencesEdit

  • bailler on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330-1500) (in French)

Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

bailler

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of baillier

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-aill, *-aills, *-aillt are modified to ail, auz, aut. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.