entrust

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

en- +‎ trust

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

entrust (third-person singular simple present entrusts, present participle entrusting, simple past and past participle entrusted)

  1. (transitive) To trust to the care of.
    • 1920, Carl D. Buck, “Hittite an Indo-European Language?”, in Classical Philology, volume 15, number 2, DOI:10.1086/360279, page 185:
      The study of the main body of Hittite texts was intrusted[sic] to the Austrian scholar Hrozny, who in 1915 published a preliminary account of his results []
    • 2004, Geert Lovink, Uncanny Networks: Dialogues with the Virtual Intelligentsia, →ISBN, page 1742:
      The first step toward finding a way out of this place begins when we take a flamethrower to Newt Gingrich cum Alvin Toffler style laissez-faire futurism, which entrusts our collective fate to the tender mercies of the marketplace, or New Age cyberbole that would have us pin our hopes to a millennial blastoff.
    Can I entrust you with a secret?
    He entrusted me his daughter.
    He entrusts that task to her.

Usage notesEdit

See usage note at commit.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit