See also: Bleck and Bléck

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English blek (ink), from Old Norse blek (black tint, ink), from Old English blæc (black tint or dye, ink), from Proto-West Germanic *blak, from Proto-Germanic *blaką (that which is black; blackness).

NounEdit

bleck (plural blecks)

  1. Any black fluid substance, as in blacking for leather, or black grease.
  2. Soot, smut.
  3. (obsolete) A black man.
  4. (dialectal) Coalfish (Pollachius virens).

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English blekken, from the noun above.

VerbEdit

bleck (third-person singular simple present blecks, present participle blecking, simple past and past participle blecked)

  1. (obsolete, dialect) To blacken.
  2. (obsolete, dialect) To defile.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wyclif to this entry?)
Related termsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for bleck in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Etymology 3Edit

Imitative.

InterjectionEdit

bleck

  1. (rare) Alternative form of blech
SynonymsEdit

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English blæc.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bleck (comparative blecker, superlative bleckest)

  1. (South Scots) black

NounEdit

bleck

  1. A challenge to a feat of exceptional skill; a baffle in reaction to such a feat.
  2. A puzzle.
  3. (South Scots) black

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Danish blik (< Middle Low German bleck), German Blech (< Old High German bleh), all from Proto-Germanic *bliką.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bleck n

  1. tin plate
  2. sheet metal

DeclensionEdit

Declension of bleck 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bleck blecket bleck blecken
Genitive blecks bleckets blecks bleckens