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See also: Puzzle

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EnglishEdit

 
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A set of different puzzles

EtymologyEdit

Origin uncertain; originally pusle. Possibly from pose (to perplex, puzzle, interrogate) +‎ -le (frequentative suffix). The verb (1590s) “to perplex” seems to predate the noun “state of being perplexed” (circa 1600), “perplexing question” (1650s), “toy” (1814).[1]

PronunciationEdit

(file)

NounEdit

puzzle (plural puzzles)

  1. Anything that is difficult to understand or make sense of.
    Where he went after he left the house is a puzzle.
  2. A game for one or more people that is more or less difficult to work out or complete.
  3. A crossword puzzle.
  4. A jigsaw puzzle.
  5. A riddle.
  6. (archaic) Something made with marvellous skill; something of ingenious construction.
  7. The state of being puzzled; perplexity.
    to be in a puzzle

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

puzzle (third-person singular simple present puzzles, present participle puzzling, simple past and past participle puzzled)

  1. (transitive) To perplex (someone).
    • (Can we date this quote?) Henry More
      A very shrewd disputant in those points is dexterous in puzzling others, if they be not thoroughpaced speculators in those great theories.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Joseph Addison
      He is perpetually puzzled and perplexed amidst his own blunders.
    • 1927, F. E. Penny, chapter 4, in Pulling the Strings:
      The case was that of a murder. It had an element of mystery about it, however, which was puzzling the authorities. A turban and loincloth soaked in blood had been found; also a staff.
  2. (intransitive) To think long and carefully, in bewilderment.
    We puzzled over the curious-shaped lock, but were unable to discover how the key should be inserted.
  3. (transitive) To make intricate; to entangle.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Joseph Addison
      The ways of Heaven are dark and intricate, / Puzzled in mazes, and perplexed with error.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Cowper
      They disentangle from the puzzled skein.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ puzzle” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English puzzle.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpazl̩/, /ˈput͡sle/

NounEdit

puzzle m

  1. jigsaw puzzle

Usage notesEdit

Also used as an indeclinable noun of various genders, most often neuter.[2]

Although the correct pronunciation of this word, which has been borrowed from English, is /ˈpazl̩/, another common informal pronunciation is /ˈput͡sle/, which is a hyperforeignism, trying to apply either Italian (as in pizza) or more probably German pronunciation rules.[3] However, both Italian and German pronunciation of the word puzzle is different.

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ puzzle in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007
  2. ^ puzzle in Internetová jazyková příručka, Institute of the Czech Language of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
  3. ^ Z dopisů jazykové poradně, Naše řeč, volume 82 (1999), issue 5

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English puzzle.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

puzzle m (plural puzzles)

  1. jigsaw puzzle

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English puzzle.

NounEdit

puzzle m (invariable)

  1. jigsaw puzzle
  2. (by extension) A difficult problem

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English puzzle.

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈpusle/, [ˈpusle]

NounEdit

puzzle m (plural puzzles)

  1. jigsaw puzzle