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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boogie (plural boogies)

  1. (informal) A piece of solid or semi-solid mucus in or removed from the nostril cavity; booger.
  2. (insult) a racial insult aimed at black people
    • 1966 Liberation: An Independent Monthly, Volumes 11-12, page 66
      in front of the White House during the crisis over admission of James Meredith to the Univeristy of Mississippi, we were counterpicketed by five members of the American Nazi Party. One of them carried two placards: one saying "Who Needs Niggers?" and the other "Back to the Trees, Boogies!" Finally a passerby, incensed by the sight of the Stars-and-Stripes being carried alongside the Nazi Swastika, assaulted one of the Nazis
  3. (informal) Dancing usually prominently exhibiting movements of the buttocks.
  4. (skydiving, informal) A large, organised skydiving event.

QuotationsEdit

  • 2007 October 23, Murry Taylor, as quoted by Eric Weiner, “High-Tech Drone to Join Battle Against Calif. Flames”, National Public Radio, at NPR.org[1]
    the fire engines are bigger, the crews are better trained and the aircraft are more modern. But we're dealing with Mother Nature, and she dances a mean boogie.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

boogie (third-person singular simple present boogies, present participle boogying or boogieing, simple past and past participle boogied)

  1. (intransitive) To dance a boogie.
    • 2007 May 28, Tim Murphy, “A Little Older and a Bit Creakier, Skaters Boogie on in Central Park”, in New York Times[2]:
      Mr. Nichols said that with permits, equipment storage fees and other expenses, it costs the association about $7,000 for a season of boogieing.
  2. (intransitive, informal) To move, walk, leave, exit.
    • Let's boogie on out of here.
    • 1999, Thom Nicholson, 15 Months with SOG: A Warrior's Tour‎, page 75:
      Again, the entire line stopped, and again, by the time I got there the enemy had boogied, having accomplished their mission: to delay and harass us
    • 2007, Blaize Clement, Curiosity Killed the Cat Sitter, page 69:
      The waiter boogied back with the drinks and did a little shimmy before he boogied off.
    • 2002, Douglas H. Chadwick, A Beast the Color of Winter: The Mountain Goat Observed‎, page 149:
      Once in a while just coming upon a tilted snowbank in the midst of a feeding area is enough to send a band boogieing away downhill.

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

boogie m (plural boogies)

  1. boogy