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See also: SOLID and sòlid

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Old French solide (as an adjective), from Latin solidus (solid).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

solid (comparative more solid, superlative most solid)

  1. (of an object or substance) That can be picked up or held, having a texture, and usually firm. Unlike a liquid or a gas.
    Almost all metals are solid at room temperature.
  2. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) Large in size, quantity, or value.
    • 2015 July 8, “Rapper Meek Mill Charts His First Number One Album”, in Forbes:
      Almost a quarter of a million copies is really a solid number for today's record industry. In fact, that number is more than the last two number one albums
    • 2018 November 7, “Consumer borrowing up solid $10.9 billion in September”, in Journal Record:
      Americans increased their borrowing by a solid amount in September. But the gain was less than half the big August surge
    • 2018 November 7, Christian de Looper, “The best Google Assistant smart speakers you can buy”, in Business Insider:
      On top of that, the speaker is big, so you may have to set aside a solid amount of space for it.
  3. Lacking holes, hollows or admixtures of other materials.
    solid gold, solid chocolate
  4. Strong or unyielding.
    a solid foundation
    • 2012 June 2, Phil McNulty, “England 1-0 Belgium”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      As in the 1-0 win against Norway in Oslo, this was an England performance built on the foundations of solid defence and tactical discipline.
  5. (slang) Excellent, of high quality, or reliable.
    That's a solid plan.
    Radiohead's on tour! Have you heard their latest album yet? It's quite solid.
    I don't think Dave would have done that. He's a solid dude.
  6. Hearty; filling.
    a solid meal
  7. Worthy of credit, trust, or esteem; substantial; not frivolous or fallacious.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      the solid purpose of a sincere and virtuous answer
    • (Can we date this quote?) Dryden
      These, wanting wit, affect gravity, and go by the name of solid men.
    • (Can we date this quote?) J. A. Symonds
      The genius of the Italians wrought by solid toil what the myth-making imagination of the Germans had projected in a poem.
  8. Sound; not weak.
    a solid constitution of body
  9. (typography) Written as one word, without spaces or hyphens.
    American English writes many words as solid that British English hyphenates.
  10. (printing, dated) Not having the lines separated by leads; not open.
  11. (US, politics, slang) United; without division; unanimous.
    The delegation is solid for a candidate.
  12. Of a single color throughout.
    John painted the walls solid white.
    He wore a solid shirt with floral pants.
  13. (of drawn lines) Continuous; unbroken; not dotted or dashed.
    The solid lines show roads, and the dotted lines footpaths.
  14. (dated) Having all the geometrical dimensions; cubic.
    A solid foot contains 1,728 solid inches.

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

solid (plural solids)

  1. (chemistry) A substance in the fundamental state of matter that retains its size and shape without need of a container (as opposed to a liquid or gas).
  2. (geometry) A three-dimensional figure (as opposed to a surface, an area, or a curve).
  3. (informal) A favor.
    Please do me a solid: lend me your car for one week.
    I owe him; he did me a solid last year.
    • 2010, Loren D. Estleman, Frames, page 54:
      Fortunately, the president of our illustrious institution has been after me for a year to get Francis Ford Coppola to speak at next year's commencement, and Francis owes me a solid.
    • 2012, Robert Cea, No Lights, No Sirens: The Corruption and Redemption of an Inner City Cop, page 61:
      You can't make a move till you have about a year in a precinct, but tell you what, stay in touch. Lots a people still owe me a solid or two on the Job.
    • 2013, Nicole Williams, Crush:
      Thomas had seemed ready to spend the night on the couch, and now he couldn't get out of here fast enough. Hopping up, I followed after him. "Thanks again, Thomas," I said, opening the door for him. "I owe you a solid."
  4. An article of clothing which is of a single color throughout.
    I prefer solids over paisleys.
  5. (in the plural) Food which is not liquid-based.
    The doctor said I can't eat any solids four hours before the operation.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AdverbEdit

solid (comparative more solid, superlative most solid)

  1. Solidly.
    • 1872, Mark Twain, Roughing It, page 306:
      True, not ten of these mines were yielding rock worth hauling to a mill, but everybody said, "Wait till the shaft gets down where the ledge comes in solid, and then you will see!"
    • 1937 March 7, Marsh, “Dan Dunn-Secret Operative 48”, in Sarasota (FL) Herald-Tribune:
      Hm-m---These papers are complete--They make Mortimer and Matilda the legal guardians of Babs--ought to put me in more solid than ever with Miss Effie--and that home is good graft.
    • 1943, Wallace Stegner, The Big Rock Candy Mountain, page 246:
      Suppose, then, a whole family got sick with this flu, and no help around, and winter setting in solid and cold three weeks early?
    • 1943 July 16, “Dodger Rebellion Is Settled With One Dramatic Flourish”, in Youngstown (OH) Vindicator:
      set a new high in baseball for the year, not only ending speculation as to when Durocher would be fired but putting him in more solid than ever before.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter XVI, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855:
      She was telling Bobbie about the time when Boko Fittleworth was trying to ingratiate himself with your Uncle Percy, and you very sportingly offered to go and call your Uncle Percy a lot of offensive names, so that Boko, hovering outside the door, could come in and stick up for him, thus putting himself in solid with him.
    • 1997, David Ambrose, Superstition, page 239:
      If true, that means he deliberately risked American and French lives, and maybe the battle, in order to get in solid with Lafayette.
    • 2008, James Oliver Curwood, The Courage of Captain Plum, page 3:
      Then he drew a long-barreled revolver from under a coat that he had thrown aside and examined it carefully to see that the powder and ball were in solid and that none of the caps was missing
    • 2009 July 26, Rika Otsuka, “Nikkei hits 6-wk high on earnings hopes, Hitachi jumps”, in Reuters.com:
      Soichi Yamazaki, chief analyst at Fukoku Capital Management said Nidec Corp's (6594.OS) earnings came in more solid than expected on Friday
  2. (not comparable, typography) Without spaces or hyphens.
    Many long-established compounds are set solid.

ReferencesEdit

  • solid at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

solid

  1. solid, robust
  2. strong
  3. substantial (e.g. et solidt måltid: a substantial meal)
  4. reliable

GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • solide (both are roughly equally common)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

solid (comparative solider, superlative am solidesten)

  1. solid

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French solide, from Latin solidus.

AdjectiveEdit

solid m, n (feminine singular solidă, masculine plural solizi, feminine and neuter plural solide)

  1. solid, firm
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin solidus.

NounEdit

solid m (plural solizi)

  1. a solidus (Roman gold coin)

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

solid

  1. solid, massive, stable, reliable
  2. solvent, in good financial standing
    och är idag ett solitt företag med 15 anställda
    and is today a respectable business with 15 employees

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of solid
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular solid solidare solidast
Neuter singular solitt solidare solidast
Plural solida solidare solidast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 solide solidare solidaste
All solida solidare solidaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

solid c

  1. (geometry) a solid body

DeclensionEdit

Declension of solid 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative solid soliden solider soliderna
Genitive solids solidens soliders solidernas