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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English brayle, from Old French braiel, from Medieval Latin bracale (girdle) (from bracae (breeches)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brail (plural brails)

  1. (nautical) A small rope used to truss up sails.
  2. (falconry) A thong of soft leather to bind up a hawk's wing.
  3. A stock at each end of a seine to keep it stretched.

VerbEdit

brail (third-person singular simple present brails, present participle brailing, simple past and past participle brailed)

  1. To reef, shorten or strike sail using brails.
    • 1993, Anthony Burgess, A Dead Man in Deptford
      The winds blew at their own caprice and there was brailing and loosing of canvas.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

brail

  1. Alternative form of brayle

YolaEdit

NounEdit

brail

  1. barrel

ReferencesEdit

  • J. Poole W. Barnes, A Glossary, with Some Pieces of Verse, of the Old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy (1867)