See also: Branca and brâncă

Catalan

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Etymology

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Inherited from Late Latin branca, possibly of Gaulish or other pre-Roman origin. Compare Occitan branca.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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branca f (plural branques)

  1. branch

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Galician

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Adjective

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branca f sg

  1. feminine singular of branco

Italian

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Etymology

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From Late Latin branca.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈbran.ka/
  • Rhymes: -anka
  • Hyphenation: bràn‧ca

Noun

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branca f (plural branche)

  1. claw (of a cat etc.)
  2. talon (of a bird)
  3. branch (of knowledge etc.)
  4. (anatomy) branch
  5. (in the plural) clutches

Derived terms

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Descendants

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Further reading

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  • branca in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Latin

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Etymology

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Perhaps of Celtic origin, from a hypothetical Gaulish *vranca, from Proto-Indo-European *wrónk-eh₂ (from which Proto-Balto-Slavic *ránkāˀ (hand, arm)). Possibly influenced by bracchium (forearm; arm; limb of an animal (e.g. claw, tentacle); branch (of a tree)).

Noun

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branca f (genitive brancae); first declension (Late Latin)

  1. paw, foot

Declension

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First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative branca brancae
Genitive brancae brancārum
Dative brancae brancīs
Accusative brancam brancās
Ablative brancā brancīs
Vocative branca brancae

Descendants

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References

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Occitan

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Etymology

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From Late Latin branca. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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branca f (plural brancas)

  1. (Languedoc, Provençal) branch

Alternative forms

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Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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Adjective

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branca

  1. feminine singular of branco

Noun

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branca f (plural brancas)

  1. brain freeze (failure to remember something)