See also: bringin

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EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

bring in

  1. To introduce a new rule, law, or system of organisation.
  2. To introduce a person or group of people to an organisation.
  3. To earn money for a company or for the family.
    • 2016 October 24, Owen Gibson, “Is the unthinkable happening – are people finally switching the football off?”, in The Guardian[1], London:
      BT shelled out almost £1bn for the Champions League over the same period, while the FA has just brought in around £820m over six seasons for the international rights to the FA Cup alone.
  4. To return a verdict in a court of law.
  5. To move something indoors.
    Could you bring in the groceries?

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