verdict

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English verdit, from Old French verdit, from veir (true) + dit (saying).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈvɝ.dɪkt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

verdict (plural verdicts)

  1. (law) A decision on an issue of fact in a civil or criminal case or an inquest.
    The jury returned a “not guilty” verdict.
    • 1892, Walter Besant, “Prologue: Who is Edmund Gray?”, in The Ivory Gate: A Novel, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], OCLC 16832619:
      Such a scandal as the prosecution of a brother for forgery—with a verdict of guilty—is a most truly horrible, deplorable, fatal thing. It takes the respectability out of a family perhaps at a critical moment, when the family is just assuming the robes of respectability: [] it is a black spot which all the soaps ever advertised could never wash off.
    • 2012, Andrew Martin, Underground Overground: A passenger’s history of the Tube, Profile Books, →ISBN, page 124:
      When his body was retrieved, it was apparent that he had not raised his hands to cover his face. Had he suffered some sort of fit or seizure? The coroner’s verdict was accidental death.
  2. An opinion or judgement.
    a “not out” verdict from the umpire

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

verdict m (plural verdicts)

  1. verdict

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

verdict

  1. Alternative form of verdit

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

verdict m (oblique plural verdicz or verdictz, nominative singular verdicz or verdictz, nominative plural verdict)

  1. Alternative form of verdit