EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɜɹ.bəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)bəl
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English burblen (to bubble), imitative.

NounEdit

burble (plural burbles)

  1. A bubbling, gurgling sound, as of a creek.
    • 1988, Bruce Chatwin, Utz, London: Jonathan Cape, →ISBN; republished London: Vintage Books, 2005, →ISBN, page 50:
      Marta's gander was a magnificent snow-white bird: the object of terror to foxes, children and dogs. She had reared him as a gosling; and whenever he approached, he would let fly a low contented burble and sidle his neck around her thighs.
  2. A gush of rapid speech.
    • 2004, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, Bloomsbury, 2005, Chapter 3,
      He could hear the music in the distance, and the burble and laughter from the library, and a high ringing in his own ears.
  3. The turbulent boundary layer about a moving streamlined body.

VerbEdit

burble (third-person singular simple present burbles, present participle burbling, simple past and past participle burbled)

  1. To bubble; to gurgle.
  2. To babble; to speak in an excited rush.
    She burbled on, as if I cared to listen.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Scottish; probably connected Old French barbouiller (to confound).

NounEdit

burble

  1. Trouble; disorder.

VerbEdit

burble (third-person singular simple present burbles, present participle burbling, simple past and past participle burbled)

  1. (transitive) To trouble or confuse.

ReferencesEdit

  • (etymology 1) American Heritage Dictionary.

AnagramsEdit