sound

See also: Sound

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English sound, sund, isund, ȝesund, from Old English sund, ġesund (sound, safe, whole, uninjured, healthy, prosperous), from Proto-Germanic *gasundaz, *sundaz (healthy), from Proto-Indo-European *sunt-, *swent- (vigorous, active, healthy). Cognate with Scots sound, soun (healthy, sound), Saterland Frisian suund, gesuund (healthy), West Frisian sûn (healthy), Dutch gezond (healthy, sound), Low German sund, gesund (healthy), German gesund (healthy, sound), Danish sund (healthy), Swedish sund (sound, healthy), Irish fétaid (to be able). Related also to German geschwind (fast, quick), Old English swīþ (strong, mighty, powerful, active, severe, violent). See swith.

AdjectiveEdit

sound (comparative sounder, superlative soundest)

  1. Healthy.
    He was safe and sound.
    In horse management a sound horse is one with no health problems that might affect its suitability for its intended work.
    • %1842%, %Henry D. Barton%, %The Law Journal Reports% (link):
      %"...the defendant promised plaintiff that the horse ... was sound in wind and limb, perfect in vision and free from vice..."%
  2. Complete, solid, or secure.
    Fred assured me the floorboards were sound.
    • Chapman
      The brasswork here, how rich it is in beams, / And how, besides, it makes the whole house sound.
  3. (mathematics, logic) (argument, logical system) having the soundness property.
    • 1992, Rudolf M. Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, page vii
      With fresh material, taxonomic conclusions are leavened by recognition that the material examined reflects the site it occupied; a herbarium packet gives one only a small fraction of the data desirable for sound conclusions. Herbarium material does not, indeed, allow one to extrapolate safely: what you see is what you get []
  4. (UK, slang) Good.
    "How are you?" - "I'm sound."
    That's a sound track you're playing.
  5. (of sleep) Quiet and deep. Sound asleep means sleeping peacefully, often deeply.
    Her sleep was sound.
  6. Heavy; laid on with force.
    a sound beating
  7. Founded in law; legal; valid; not defective.
    a sound title to land
HypernymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AdverbEdit

sound (comparative more sound, superlative most sound)

  1. Soundly.
    • Spenser
      So sound he slept that naught might him awake.

InterjectionEdit

sound

  1. (UK, slang) Yes; used to show agreement or understanding, generally without much enthusiasm.
    "I found my jacket." - "Sound."

Etymology 2Edit

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NounEdit

sound (plural sounds)

  1. A sensation perceived by the ear caused by the vibration of air or some other medium.
    Nobody made a sound.
    He turned when he heard the sound of footsteps behind him.
    • Milton
      The warlike sound / Of trumpets loud and clarions.
  2. A vibration capable of causing this.
  3. (music) A distinctive style and sonority of a particular musician, orchestra etc
  4. Noise without meaning; empty noise.
    • John Locke
      Sense and not sound [] must be the principle.
SynonymsEdit
TroponymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

sound (third-person singular simple present sounds, present participle sounding, simple past and past participle sounded)

  1. (intransitive) To produce a sound.
    When the horn sounds, take cover.
  2. (intransitive, copulative) To convey an impression by one's sound.
    He sounded good when we last spoke.
    That story sounds like a pack of lies!
    • Shakespeare
      How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues!
  3. (intransitive) To be conveyed in sound; to be spread or published; to convey intelligence by sound.
    • Bible, 1 Thessalonians i. 8
      From you sounded out the word of the Lord.
  4. (intransitive, law) Often with "in"; to arise or to be recognizable as arising within a particular area of law.
    • 1999, Supreme Court of the United States, City of Monterey v. Del Monte Dunes at Montery, Ltd. et al.[1]:
      [T]here can be no doubt that claims brought pursuant to § 1983 sound in tort.
  5. (transitive) To cause to produce a sound.
    He sounds the instrument.
  6. (phonetics) To pronounce a vowel or a consonant.
    The "e" in "house" isn't sounded.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English sound, sund, from Old English sund (the power, capacity, or act of swimming; swimming; sea; ocean; water; sound; strait; channel), from Proto-Germanic *sundą (swimming; sound), from Proto-Indo-European *swem- (swimming; sea). Cognate with Dutch sond (sound; strait), Danish sund (sound; strait; channel), Swedish sund (sound; strait; channel), Icelandic sund (sound; strait; channel). Related to swim.

NounEdit

sound (plural sounds)

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  1. (geography) A long narrow inlet, or a strait between the mainland and an island; also, a strait connecting two seas, or connecting a sea or lake with the ocean.
    Puget Sound; Owen Sound
    • Camden
      The Sound of Denmark, where ships pay toll.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Middle English sounden, from Old French sonder, from sonde (sounding line) of Germanic origin, compare Old English sundgyrd (a sounding rod), sundline (a sounding line), Old English sund (water", "sea). More at Etymology 3 above

VerbEdit

sound (third-person singular simple present sounds, present participle sounding, simple past and past participle sounded)

  1. (intransitive) dive downwards, used of a whale.
    The whale sounded and eight hundred feet of heavy line streaked out of the line tub before he ended his dive.
  2. To ascertain, or try to ascertain, the thoughts, motives, and purposes of (a person); to examine; to try; to test; to probe.
    When I sounded him, he appeared to favor the proposed deal.
    • Dryden
      I was in jest, / And by that offer meant to sound your breast.
    • Addison
      I've sounded my Numidians man by man.
  3. test; ascertain the depth of water with a sounding line or other device.
    Mariners on sailing ships would sound the depth of the water with a weighted rope.
  4. (medicine) To examine with the instrument called a sound, or by auscultation or percussion.
    to sound a patient, or the bladder or urethra
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

sound (plural sounds)

  1. A long, thin probe for sounding body cavities or canals such as the urethra.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

Old English sund, a swimming, akin to modern swim.

NounEdit

sound (plural sounds)

  1. The air bladder of a fish.
    Cod sounds are an esteemed article of food.
  2. A cuttlefish.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ainsworth to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English

NounEdit

sound m (invariable)

  1. (music) sound (distinctive style and sonority)
Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 15:16