French edit

 
buse

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /byz/
  • (file)

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old French buison, buson, from Latin būteōnem.

Noun edit

buse f (plural buses)

  1. hawk or buzzard (genus Buteo)
  2. (colloquial) idiot, fool
  3. (Belgium) fail (fail of an exam, in school)
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Verb edit

buse

  1. inflection of buser:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Etymology 2 edit

Probably from Old French busel, itself from Latin būcina with a change of suffix to -el. Or from a shortening of a hypothetical earlier *bu(i)sene. Cf. the related buisine, as well as the borrowed buccine.

Noun edit

buse f (plural buses)

  1. nozzle
  2. pipe, conduit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Swedish edit

Noun edit

buse c

  1. someone uncivil and antisocial (usually a male); a ruffian

Usage notes edit

Similarly colloquial tone to ruffian. Sometimes used less seriously: Klassens buse ― The bad kid in the class

Declension edit

Declension of buse 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative buse busen busar busarna
Genitive buses busens busars busarnas

Derived terms edit

References edit

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkish بوسه (buse), from Persian بوسه (buse, kiss).

Noun edit

buse

  1. (dated) kiss, smooch

Declension edit

Inflection
Nominative buse
Definite accusative buseyi
Singular Plural
Nominative buse buseler
Definite accusative buseyi buseleri
Dative buseye buselere
Locative busede buselerde
Ablative buseden buselerden
Genitive busenin buselerin

Synonyms edit

References edit

  • Meninski, Franciszek à Mesgnien (1680) “buse”, in Thesaurus linguarum orientalium, Turcicae, Arabicae, Persicae, praecipuas earum opes à Turcis peculiariter usurpatas continens, nimirum Lexicon Turkico-Arabico-Persicum[1], Vienna, column 924